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Liquid alloy printing of microfluidic stretchable electronics.
Lab Chip. 2012 Nov 21; 12(22):4657-64.LC

Abstract

Recently, microfluidic stretchable electronics has attracted great interest from academia since conductive liquids allow for larger cross-sections when stretched and hence low resistance at longer lengths. However, as a serial process it has suffered from low throughput, and a parallel processing technology is needed for more complex systems and production at low costs. In this work, we demonstrate such a technology to implement microfluidic electronics by stencil printing of a liquid alloy onto a semi-cured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate, assembly of rigid active components, encapsulation by pouring uncured PDMS on-top and subsequent curing. The printing showed resolution of 200 μm and linear resistance increase of the liquid conductors when elongated up to 60%. No significant change of resistance was shown for a circuit with one LED after 1000 times of cycling between a 0% and an elongation of 60% every 2 s. A radio frequency identity (RFID) tag was demonstrated using the developed technology, showing that good performance could be maintained well into the radio frequency (RF) range.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box-534, The Angstrom Laboratory, SE-751 21, Uppsala, Sweden.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23038427

Citation

Jeong, Seung Hee, et al. "Liquid Alloy Printing of Microfluidic Stretchable Electronics." Lab On a Chip, vol. 12, no. 22, 2012, pp. 4657-64.
Jeong SH, Hagman A, Hjort K, et al. Liquid alloy printing of microfluidic stretchable electronics. Lab Chip. 2012;12(22):4657-64.
Jeong, S. H., Hagman, A., Hjort, K., Jobs, M., Sundqvist, J., & Wu, Z. (2012). Liquid alloy printing of microfluidic stretchable electronics. Lab On a Chip, 12(22), 4657-64. https://doi.org/10.1039/c2lc40628d
Jeong SH, et al. Liquid Alloy Printing of Microfluidic Stretchable Electronics. Lab Chip. 2012 Nov 21;12(22):4657-64. PubMed PMID: 23038427.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Liquid alloy printing of microfluidic stretchable electronics. AU - Jeong,Seung Hee, AU - Hagman,Anton, AU - Hjort,Klas, AU - Jobs,Magnus, AU - Sundqvist,Johan, AU - Wu,Zhigang, PY - 2012/10/6/entrez PY - 2012/10/6/pubmed PY - 2012/10/6/medline SP - 4657 EP - 64 JF - Lab on a chip JO - Lab Chip VL - 12 IS - 22 N2 - Recently, microfluidic stretchable electronics has attracted great interest from academia since conductive liquids allow for larger cross-sections when stretched and hence low resistance at longer lengths. However, as a serial process it has suffered from low throughput, and a parallel processing technology is needed for more complex systems and production at low costs. In this work, we demonstrate such a technology to implement microfluidic electronics by stencil printing of a liquid alloy onto a semi-cured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate, assembly of rigid active components, encapsulation by pouring uncured PDMS on-top and subsequent curing. The printing showed resolution of 200 μm and linear resistance increase of the liquid conductors when elongated up to 60%. No significant change of resistance was shown for a circuit with one LED after 1000 times of cycling between a 0% and an elongation of 60% every 2 s. A radio frequency identity (RFID) tag was demonstrated using the developed technology, showing that good performance could be maintained well into the radio frequency (RF) range. SN - 1473-0189 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23038427/Liquid_alloy_printing_of_microfluidic_stretchable_electronics_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1039/c2lc40628d DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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