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Elevated immune-inflammatory signaling in mood disorders: a new therapeutic target?
Expert Rev Neurother. 2012 Sep; 12(9):1143-61.ER

Abstract

Converging translational evidence has implicated elevated immune-inflammatory signaling activity in the pathoetiology of mood disorders, including major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. This is supported in part by cross-sectional evidence for increased levels of proinflammatory eicosanoids, cytokines and acute-phase proteins during mood episodes, and prospective longitudinal evidence for the emergence of mood symptoms in response to chronic immune-inflammatory activation. In addition, mood-stabilizer and atypical antipsychotic medications downregulate initial components of the immune-inflammatory signaling pathway, and adjunctive treatment with anti-inflammatory agents augment the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressant, mood stabilizer and atypical antipsychotic medications. Potential pathogenic mechanisms linked with elevated immune-inflammatory signaling include perturbations in central serotonin neurotransmission and progressive white matter pathology. Both heritable genetic factors and environmental factors including dietary fatty-acid composition may act in concert to sustain elevated immune-inflammatory signaling. Collectively, these data suggest that elevated immune-inflammatory signaling is a mechanism that is relevant to the pathoetiology of mood disorders, and may therefore represent a new therapeutic target for the development of more effective treatments.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Division of Bipolar Disorders Research, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA. robert.mcnamara@uc.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23039393

Citation

McNamara, Robert K., and Francis E. Lotrich. "Elevated Immune-inflammatory Signaling in Mood Disorders: a New Therapeutic Target?" Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, vol. 12, no. 9, 2012, pp. 1143-61.
McNamara RK, Lotrich FE. Elevated immune-inflammatory signaling in mood disorders: a new therapeutic target? Expert Rev Neurother. 2012;12(9):1143-61.
McNamara, R. K., & Lotrich, F. E. (2012). Elevated immune-inflammatory signaling in mood disorders: a new therapeutic target? Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, 12(9), 1143-61. https://doi.org/10.1586/ern.12.98
McNamara RK, Lotrich FE. Elevated Immune-inflammatory Signaling in Mood Disorders: a New Therapeutic Target. Expert Rev Neurother. 2012;12(9):1143-61. PubMed PMID: 23039393.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Elevated immune-inflammatory signaling in mood disorders: a new therapeutic target? AU - McNamara,Robert K, AU - Lotrich,Francis E, PY - 2012/10/9/entrez PY - 2012/10/9/pubmed PY - 2013/2/28/medline SP - 1143 EP - 61 JF - Expert review of neurotherapeutics JO - Expert Rev Neurother VL - 12 IS - 9 N2 - Converging translational evidence has implicated elevated immune-inflammatory signaling activity in the pathoetiology of mood disorders, including major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. This is supported in part by cross-sectional evidence for increased levels of proinflammatory eicosanoids, cytokines and acute-phase proteins during mood episodes, and prospective longitudinal evidence for the emergence of mood symptoms in response to chronic immune-inflammatory activation. In addition, mood-stabilizer and atypical antipsychotic medications downregulate initial components of the immune-inflammatory signaling pathway, and adjunctive treatment with anti-inflammatory agents augment the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressant, mood stabilizer and atypical antipsychotic medications. Potential pathogenic mechanisms linked with elevated immune-inflammatory signaling include perturbations in central serotonin neurotransmission and progressive white matter pathology. Both heritable genetic factors and environmental factors including dietary fatty-acid composition may act in concert to sustain elevated immune-inflammatory signaling. Collectively, these data suggest that elevated immune-inflammatory signaling is a mechanism that is relevant to the pathoetiology of mood disorders, and may therefore represent a new therapeutic target for the development of more effective treatments. SN - 1744-8360 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23039393/Elevated_immune_inflammatory_signaling_in_mood_disorders:_a_new_therapeutic_target L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/ern.12.98 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -