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Migraine and motion sensitivity.
Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2012 Oct; 18(5 Neuro-otology):1102-17.C

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

This article describes vestibular migraine and motion sensitivity. Migraine headache is often accompanied by dizziness or unsteadiness. A diagnosis of vestibular migraine requires that a patient meet International Headache Society criteria for migraine headache, have episodic or fluctuating symptoms highly suggestive of a balance disorder, have no recognized alternative neuro-otologic diagnosis, and experience migrainous symptoms during episodes of vertigo or imbalance. This article discusses these diagnostic criteria; the epidemiology of vestibular migraine; laboratory abnormalities in vestibular migraine; the pathophysiology of vestibular migraine; the treatment of vestibular migraine; comorbidities and overlap with other neuro-otologic disorders, including basilar artery migraine, Ménière disease, and anxiety disorders; and the genetics of vestibular migraine. This review also discusses motion sickness and motion sensitivity, including their relationship with migraine, pathophysiology, and treatment.

RECENT FINDINGS

Recent findings regarding vestibular migraine include new nomenclature for the disorder, validation of diagnostic criteria, new ideas regarding pathophysiology, and reviews of small treatment trials.

SUMMARY

Vestibular migraine is becoming the preferred designation for a neuro-otologic disorder with a migrainous etiology that causes dizziness and disequilibrium. Criteria have been established for diagnosing this disorder. Although pathophysiology is as yet uncertain and randomized trials are lacking, treatment recommendations can be made. Motion sickness represents a condition often associated with migraine that can reduce quality of life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Pittsburgh, Department of Otolaryngology, 200 Lothrop Street, Suite 500, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. furman@pitt.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23042062

Citation

Furman, Joseph M., and Dawn A. Marcus. "Migraine and Motion Sensitivity." Continuum (Minneapolis, Minn.), vol. 18, no. 5 Neuro-otology, 2012, pp. 1102-17.
Furman JM, Marcus DA. Migraine and motion sensitivity. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2012;18(5 Neuro-otology):1102-17.
Furman, J. M., & Marcus, D. A. (2012). Migraine and motion sensitivity. Continuum (Minneapolis, Minn.), 18(5 Neuro-otology), 1102-17. https://doi.org/10.1212/01.CON.0000421621.18407.96
Furman JM, Marcus DA. Migraine and Motion Sensitivity. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2012;18(5 Neuro-otology):1102-17. PubMed PMID: 23042062.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Migraine and motion sensitivity. AU - Furman,Joseph M, AU - Marcus,Dawn A, PY - 2012/10/9/entrez PY - 2012/10/9/pubmed PY - 2013/2/5/medline SP - 1102 EP - 17 JF - Continuum (Minneapolis, Minn.) JO - Continuum (Minneap Minn) VL - 18 IS - 5 Neuro-otology N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article describes vestibular migraine and motion sensitivity. Migraine headache is often accompanied by dizziness or unsteadiness. A diagnosis of vestibular migraine requires that a patient meet International Headache Society criteria for migraine headache, have episodic or fluctuating symptoms highly suggestive of a balance disorder, have no recognized alternative neuro-otologic diagnosis, and experience migrainous symptoms during episodes of vertigo or imbalance. This article discusses these diagnostic criteria; the epidemiology of vestibular migraine; laboratory abnormalities in vestibular migraine; the pathophysiology of vestibular migraine; the treatment of vestibular migraine; comorbidities and overlap with other neuro-otologic disorders, including basilar artery migraine, Ménière disease, and anxiety disorders; and the genetics of vestibular migraine. This review also discusses motion sickness and motion sensitivity, including their relationship with migraine, pathophysiology, and treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent findings regarding vestibular migraine include new nomenclature for the disorder, validation of diagnostic criteria, new ideas regarding pathophysiology, and reviews of small treatment trials. SUMMARY: Vestibular migraine is becoming the preferred designation for a neuro-otologic disorder with a migrainous etiology that causes dizziness and disequilibrium. Criteria have been established for diagnosing this disorder. Although pathophysiology is as yet uncertain and randomized trials are lacking, treatment recommendations can be made. Motion sickness represents a condition often associated with migraine that can reduce quality of life. SN - 1538-6899 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23042062/Migraine_and_motion_sensitivity_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1212/01.CON.0000421621.18407.96 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -