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Cannabidiol inhibits THC-elicited paranoid symptoms and hippocampal-dependent memory impairment.

Abstract

Community-based studies suggest that cannabis products that are high in Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) but low in cannabidiol (CBD) are particularly hazardous for mental health. Laboratory-based studies are ideal for clarifying this issue because THC and CBD can be administered in pure form, under controlled conditions. In a between-subjects design, we tested the hypothesis that pre-treatment with CBD inhibited THC-elicited psychosis and cognitive impairment. Healthy participants were randomised to receive oral CBD 600 mg (n=22) or placebo (n=26), 210 min ahead of intravenous (IV) THC (1.5 mg). Post-THC, there were lower PANSS positive scores in the CBD group, but this did not reach statistical significance. However, clinically significant positive psychotic symptoms (defined a priori as increases ≥ 3 points) were less likely in the CBD group compared with the placebo group, odds ratio (OR)=0.22 (χ²=4.74, p<0.05). In agreement, post-THC paranoia, as rated with the State Social Paranoia Scale (SSPS), was less in the CBD group compared with the placebo group (t=2.28, p<0.05). Episodic memory, indexed by scores on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Task-revised (HVLT-R), was poorer, relative to baseline, in the placebo pre-treated group (-10.6 ± 18.9%) compared with the CBD group (-0.4% ± 9.7 %) (t=2.39, p<0.05). These findings support the idea that high-THC/low-CBD cannabis products are associated with increased risks for mental health.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    The Biomedical Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, UK.

    , , , , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Cannabidiol
    Cannabis
    Cognitive Dysfunction
    Double-Blind Method
    Dronabinol
    Drug Interactions
    Female
    Hippocampus
    Humans
    Learning
    Male
    Memory Disorders
    Paranoid Disorders

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23042808

    Citation

    Englund, Amir, et al. "Cannabidiol Inhibits THC-elicited Paranoid Symptoms and Hippocampal-dependent Memory Impairment." Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England), vol. 27, no. 1, 2013, pp. 19-27.
    Englund A, Morrison PD, Nottage J, et al. Cannabidiol inhibits THC-elicited paranoid symptoms and hippocampal-dependent memory impairment. J Psychopharmacol (Oxford). 2013;27(1):19-27.
    Englund, A., Morrison, P. D., Nottage, J., Hague, D., Kane, F., Bonaccorso, S., ... Kapur, S. (2013). Cannabidiol inhibits THC-elicited paranoid symptoms and hippocampal-dependent memory impairment. Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England), 27(1), pp. 19-27. doi:10.1177/0269881112460109.
    Englund A, et al. Cannabidiol Inhibits THC-elicited Paranoid Symptoms and Hippocampal-dependent Memory Impairment. J Psychopharmacol (Oxford). 2013;27(1):19-27. PubMed PMID: 23042808.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Cannabidiol inhibits THC-elicited paranoid symptoms and hippocampal-dependent memory impairment. AU - Englund,Amir, AU - Morrison,Paul D, AU - Nottage,Judith, AU - Hague,Dominic, AU - Kane,Fergus, AU - Bonaccorso,Stefania, AU - Stone,James M, AU - Reichenberg,Avi, AU - Brenneisen,Rudolf, AU - Holt,David, AU - Feilding,Amanda, AU - Walker,Lucy, AU - Murray,Robin M, AU - Kapur,Shitij, Y1 - 2012/10/05/ PY - 2012/10/9/entrez PY - 2012/10/9/pubmed PY - 2013/9/4/medline SP - 19 EP - 27 JF - Journal of psychopharmacology (Oxford, England) JO - J. Psychopharmacol. (Oxford) VL - 27 IS - 1 N2 - Community-based studies suggest that cannabis products that are high in Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) but low in cannabidiol (CBD) are particularly hazardous for mental health. Laboratory-based studies are ideal for clarifying this issue because THC and CBD can be administered in pure form, under controlled conditions. In a between-subjects design, we tested the hypothesis that pre-treatment with CBD inhibited THC-elicited psychosis and cognitive impairment. Healthy participants were randomised to receive oral CBD 600 mg (n=22) or placebo (n=26), 210 min ahead of intravenous (IV) THC (1.5 mg). Post-THC, there were lower PANSS positive scores in the CBD group, but this did not reach statistical significance. However, clinically significant positive psychotic symptoms (defined a priori as increases ≥ 3 points) were less likely in the CBD group compared with the placebo group, odds ratio (OR)=0.22 (χ²=4.74, p<0.05). In agreement, post-THC paranoia, as rated with the State Social Paranoia Scale (SSPS), was less in the CBD group compared with the placebo group (t=2.28, p<0.05). Episodic memory, indexed by scores on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Task-revised (HVLT-R), was poorer, relative to baseline, in the placebo pre-treated group (-10.6 ± 18.9%) compared with the CBD group (-0.4% ± 9.7 %) (t=2.39, p<0.05). These findings support the idea that high-THC/low-CBD cannabis products are associated with increased risks for mental health. SN - 1461-7285 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23042808/Cannabidiol_inhibits_THC_elicited_paranoid_symptoms_and_hippocampal_dependent_memory_impairment_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0269881112460109?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -