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Dietary iron intake, body iron stores, and the risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
BMC Med 2012; 10:119BM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Excess iron has been shown to induce diabetes in animal models. However, the results from human epidemiologic studies linking body iron stores and iron intake to the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are conflicting. In this study, we aimed to systematically evaluate the available evidence for associations between iron intake, body iron stores, and the risk of T2DM.

METHODS

A systematic search of the PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases to the end of 22 April 2012 was performed, and reference lists of retrieved articles were screened. Two reviewers independently evaluated the eligibility of inclusion and extracted the data. Pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random-effects models.

RESULTS

We reviewed 449 potentially relevant articles, and 11 prospective studies were included in the analysis. A meta-analysis of five studies gave a pooled RR for T2DM of 1.33 (95% CI 1.19 to 1.48; P<0.001) in individuals with the highest level of heme iron intake, compared with those with the lowest level. The pooled RR for T2DM for a daily increment of 1 mg of heme iron intake was 1.16 (1.09 to 1.23, P<0.001). Body iron stores, as measured by ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and the sTfR:ferritin ratio, were significantly associated with the risk of T2DM. The pooled RRs for T2DM in individuals with the highest versus the lowest intake of ferritin levels was 1.70 (1.27-2.27, P<0.001) before adjustment for inflammatory markers and 1.63 (1.03-2.56, P = 0.036) after adjustment. We did not find any significant association of dietary intakes of total iron, non-heme, or supplemental iron intake with T2DM risk.

CONCLUSION

Higher heme iron intake and increased body iron stores were significantly associated with a greater risk of T2DM. Dietary total iron, non-heme iron, or supplemental iron intakes were not significantly associated with T2DM risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030, P,R, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23046549

Citation

Bao, Wei, et al. "Dietary Iron Intake, Body Iron Stores, and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." BMC Medicine, vol. 10, 2012, p. 119.
Bao W, Rong Y, Rong S, et al. Dietary iron intake, body iron stores, and the risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Med. 2012;10:119.
Bao, W., Rong, Y., Rong, S., & Liu, L. (2012). Dietary iron intake, body iron stores, and the risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Medicine, 10, p. 119. doi:10.1186/1741-7015-10-119.
Bao W, et al. Dietary Iron Intake, Body Iron Stores, and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. BMC Med. 2012 Oct 10;10:119. PubMed PMID: 23046549.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary iron intake, body iron stores, and the risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. AU - Bao,Wei, AU - Rong,Ying, AU - Rong,Shuang, AU - Liu,Liegang, Y1 - 2012/10/10/ PY - 2012/06/10/received PY - 2012/10/10/accepted PY - 2012/10/11/entrez PY - 2012/10/11/pubmed PY - 2013/3/7/medline SP - 119 EP - 119 JF - BMC medicine JO - BMC Med VL - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Excess iron has been shown to induce diabetes in animal models. However, the results from human epidemiologic studies linking body iron stores and iron intake to the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are conflicting. In this study, we aimed to systematically evaluate the available evidence for associations between iron intake, body iron stores, and the risk of T2DM. METHODS: A systematic search of the PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases to the end of 22 April 2012 was performed, and reference lists of retrieved articles were screened. Two reviewers independently evaluated the eligibility of inclusion and extracted the data. Pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random-effects models. RESULTS: We reviewed 449 potentially relevant articles, and 11 prospective studies were included in the analysis. A meta-analysis of five studies gave a pooled RR for T2DM of 1.33 (95% CI 1.19 to 1.48; P<0.001) in individuals with the highest level of heme iron intake, compared with those with the lowest level. The pooled RR for T2DM for a daily increment of 1 mg of heme iron intake was 1.16 (1.09 to 1.23, P<0.001). Body iron stores, as measured by ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and the sTfR:ferritin ratio, were significantly associated with the risk of T2DM. The pooled RRs for T2DM in individuals with the highest versus the lowest intake of ferritin levels was 1.70 (1.27-2.27, P<0.001) before adjustment for inflammatory markers and 1.63 (1.03-2.56, P = 0.036) after adjustment. We did not find any significant association of dietary intakes of total iron, non-heme, or supplemental iron intake with T2DM risk. CONCLUSION: Higher heme iron intake and increased body iron stores were significantly associated with a greater risk of T2DM. Dietary total iron, non-heme iron, or supplemental iron intakes were not significantly associated with T2DM risk. SN - 1741-7015 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23046549/Dietary_iron_intake_body_iron_stores_and_the_risk_of_type_2_diabetes:_a_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1741-7015-10-119 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -