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Effects of silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate in the earthworm reproduction test.
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2013 Jan; 32(1):181-8.ET

Abstract

The widespread use of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs), for example, in textiles and cleaning products, means that they are likely to reach the environment via biosolids or the effluent from wastewater treatment plants. The aim of the present study was to determine the ecotoxicity of Ag-NPs in the earthworm reproduction test using Eisenia andrei. In addition to the usual endpoints, the authors also investigated the uptake and accumulation of Ag by adult earthworms and the concentration of free Ag(+) in soil pore water. Silver nanoparticles and Ag nitrate showed similar toxicities in the earthworm reproduction test. The uptake of Ag from Ag-NPs in the earthworm was slightly higher than the uptake of Ag from Ag nitrate. Spiked soils showed a concentration-dependent effect on reproduction, but there was no concentration-dependent increase in the amount of Ag in earthworm tissues. The authors noted a concentration-dependent increase in the levels of free Ag(+) in the soil pore water regardless of the Ag source. The number of juveniles is a more suitable endpoint than biomass or mortality. The uptake of Ag does not appear to inhibit reproduction. Instead, inhibition seems to reflect Ag(+) released into the soil pore water, which affects cocoons and juveniles in the soil. Analysis of transformed Ag-NPs after purification in wastewater treatment plants would provide additional information.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology, Schmallenberg, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23059754

Citation

Schlich, Karsten, et al. "Effects of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Nitrate in the Earthworm Reproduction Test." Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, vol. 32, no. 1, 2013, pp. 181-8.
Schlich K, Klawonn T, Terytze K, et al. Effects of silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate in the earthworm reproduction test. Environ Toxicol Chem. 2013;32(1):181-8.
Schlich, K., Klawonn, T., Terytze, K., & Hund-Rinke, K. (2013). Effects of silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate in the earthworm reproduction test. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 32(1), 181-8. https://doi.org/10.1002/etc.2030
Schlich K, et al. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Nitrate in the Earthworm Reproduction Test. Environ Toxicol Chem. 2013;32(1):181-8. PubMed PMID: 23059754.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate in the earthworm reproduction test. AU - Schlich,Karsten, AU - Klawonn,Thorsten, AU - Terytze,Konstantin, AU - Hund-Rinke,Kerstin, Y1 - 2012/11/21/ PY - 2012/07/13/received PY - 2012/08/08/revised PY - 2012/08/28/accepted PY - 2012/10/13/entrez PY - 2012/10/13/pubmed PY - 2013/7/24/medline SP - 181 EP - 8 JF - Environmental toxicology and chemistry JO - Environ Toxicol Chem VL - 32 IS - 1 N2 - The widespread use of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs), for example, in textiles and cleaning products, means that they are likely to reach the environment via biosolids or the effluent from wastewater treatment plants. The aim of the present study was to determine the ecotoxicity of Ag-NPs in the earthworm reproduction test using Eisenia andrei. In addition to the usual endpoints, the authors also investigated the uptake and accumulation of Ag by adult earthworms and the concentration of free Ag(+) in soil pore water. Silver nanoparticles and Ag nitrate showed similar toxicities in the earthworm reproduction test. The uptake of Ag from Ag-NPs in the earthworm was slightly higher than the uptake of Ag from Ag nitrate. Spiked soils showed a concentration-dependent effect on reproduction, but there was no concentration-dependent increase in the amount of Ag in earthworm tissues. The authors noted a concentration-dependent increase in the levels of free Ag(+) in the soil pore water regardless of the Ag source. The number of juveniles is a more suitable endpoint than biomass or mortality. The uptake of Ag does not appear to inhibit reproduction. Instead, inhibition seems to reflect Ag(+) released into the soil pore water, which affects cocoons and juveniles in the soil. Analysis of transformed Ag-NPs after purification in wastewater treatment plants would provide additional information. SN - 1552-8618 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23059754/Effects_of_silver_nanoparticles_and_silver_nitrate_in_the_earthworm_reproduction_test_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/etc.2030 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -