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Increasing children's lunchtime consumption of fruit and vegetables: an evaluation of the Food Dudes programme.
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Jun; 16(6):1066-72.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Although previous research has shown that the Food Dudes programme increases children's fruit and vegetable consumption at school, there has been limited evaluation of the extent to which changes are maintained in the long term. Furthermore, despite knowledge that the nutritional content of home-supplied meals is lower than that of school-supplied meals, little consideration has been given to the programme's impact on meals provided from home. The present study therefore assessed the long-term effectiveness of the Food Dudes programme for both school- and home-supplied lunches.

DESIGN

Two cohorts of children participated, one receiving the Food Dudes intervention and a matched control group who did not receive any intervention. Consumption of fruit and vegetables was assessed pre-intervention, then at 3 and 12 months post-intervention. Consumption was measured across five consecutive days in each school using weighed intake (school-provided meals) and digital photography (home-provided meals).

SETTING

Fifteen primary schools, six intervention (n 1282) and seven control schools (n 1151).

SUBJECTS

Participants were children aged 4-11 years.

RESULTS

A significant increase in the consumption of fruit and vegetables was found at 3 months for children in the intervention schools, but only for those eating school-supplied lunches. However, increases were not maintained at 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS

The Food Dudes programme has a limited effect in producing even short-term changes in children's fruit and vegetable consumption at lunchtime. Further development work is required to ensure the short- and long-term effectiveness of interventions promoting fruit and vegetable consumption in children such as the Food Dudes programme.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Health and Society, University of Worcester, Henwick Grove, Worcester WR2 6AJ, UK. p.upton@worc.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23067425

Citation

Upton, Dominic, et al. "Increasing Children's Lunchtime Consumption of Fruit and Vegetables: an Evaluation of the Food Dudes Programme." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 16, no. 6, 2013, pp. 1066-72.
Upton D, Upton P, Taylor C. Increasing children's lunchtime consumption of fruit and vegetables: an evaluation of the Food Dudes programme. Public Health Nutr. 2013;16(6):1066-72.
Upton, D., Upton, P., & Taylor, C. (2013). Increasing children's lunchtime consumption of fruit and vegetables: an evaluation of the Food Dudes programme. Public Health Nutrition, 16(6), 1066-72. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980012004612
Upton D, Upton P, Taylor C. Increasing Children's Lunchtime Consumption of Fruit and Vegetables: an Evaluation of the Food Dudes Programme. Public Health Nutr. 2013;16(6):1066-72. PubMed PMID: 23067425.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increasing children's lunchtime consumption of fruit and vegetables: an evaluation of the Food Dudes programme. AU - Upton,Dominic, AU - Upton,Penney, AU - Taylor,Charlotte, Y1 - 2012/10/16/ PY - 2012/10/17/entrez PY - 2012/10/17/pubmed PY - 2013/12/18/medline SP - 1066 EP - 72 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 16 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Although previous research has shown that the Food Dudes programme increases children's fruit and vegetable consumption at school, there has been limited evaluation of the extent to which changes are maintained in the long term. Furthermore, despite knowledge that the nutritional content of home-supplied meals is lower than that of school-supplied meals, little consideration has been given to the programme's impact on meals provided from home. The present study therefore assessed the long-term effectiveness of the Food Dudes programme for both school- and home-supplied lunches. DESIGN: Two cohorts of children participated, one receiving the Food Dudes intervention and a matched control group who did not receive any intervention. Consumption of fruit and vegetables was assessed pre-intervention, then at 3 and 12 months post-intervention. Consumption was measured across five consecutive days in each school using weighed intake (school-provided meals) and digital photography (home-provided meals). SETTING: Fifteen primary schools, six intervention (n 1282) and seven control schools (n 1151). SUBJECTS: Participants were children aged 4-11 years. RESULTS: A significant increase in the consumption of fruit and vegetables was found at 3 months for children in the intervention schools, but only for those eating school-supplied lunches. However, increases were not maintained at 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: The Food Dudes programme has a limited effect in producing even short-term changes in children's fruit and vegetable consumption at lunchtime. Further development work is required to ensure the short- and long-term effectiveness of interventions promoting fruit and vegetable consumption in children such as the Food Dudes programme. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23067425/Increasing_children's_lunchtime_consumption_of_fruit_and_vegetables:_an_evaluation_of_the_Food_Dudes_programme_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980012004612/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -