Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Cost effectiveness of oromucosal cannabis-based medicine (Sativex®) for spasticity in multiple sclerosis.
Pharmacoeconomics. 2012 Dec 01; 30(12):1157-71.P

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Spasticity is common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and is a major contributor to disability. Sativex®, an oromucosal spray containing cannabis-based medicinal products, has been found to be effective in reducing spasticity symptoms.

OBJECTIVE

Our objective was to estimate the cost effectiveness of Sativex® plus oral anti-spasticity medicines compared with the current standard treatment for moderate or severe spasticity in MS in the UK.

METHODS

A Markov model was used to assess the costs and benefits of Sativex® plus oral anti-spasticity medicines or current standard treatment based on their effects on the quality of life of patients. The main outcome was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) in terms of costs per additional QALY gained over 5 years of treatment. One-way, multi-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to explore the impact of uncertainties on the findings.

RESULTS

In the base case, Sativex® plus oral anti-spasticity medicines resulted in incremental costs of £7600 and a QALY gain of 0.15 per person over 5 years (ICER = £49 300 per QALY).[year 2009 data for costs]. Findings were sensitive to the costs of Sativex® (price and dose) and differences in utilities between responders and non-responders.

CONCLUSIONS

Using a willingness-to-pay threshold of £30 000 per QALY, Sativex® appears unlikely to be considered cost effective by UK funders of healthcare for spasticity in MS. This is unfortunate, since it appears that Sativex® use is likely to benefit some patients in the management of this common consequence of MS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Peninsula Technology Assessment Group (PenTAG), Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Exeter, UK. lulanting@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23072659

Citation

Lu, Lanting, et al. "Cost Effectiveness of Oromucosal Cannabis-based Medicine (Sativex®) for Spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis." PharmacoEconomics, vol. 30, no. 12, 2012, pp. 1157-71.
Lu L, Pearce H, Roome C, et al. Cost effectiveness of oromucosal cannabis-based medicine (Sativex®) for spasticity in multiple sclerosis. Pharmacoeconomics. 2012;30(12):1157-71.
Lu, L., Pearce, H., Roome, C., Shearer, J., Lang, I. A., & Stein, K. (2012). Cost effectiveness of oromucosal cannabis-based medicine (Sativex®) for spasticity in multiple sclerosis. PharmacoEconomics, 30(12), 1157-71. https://doi.org/10.2165/11598470-000000000-00000
Lu L, et al. Cost Effectiveness of Oromucosal Cannabis-based Medicine (Sativex®) for Spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis. Pharmacoeconomics. 2012 Dec 1;30(12):1157-71. PubMed PMID: 23072659.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cost effectiveness of oromucosal cannabis-based medicine (Sativex®) for spasticity in multiple sclerosis. AU - Lu,Lanting, AU - Pearce,Hilary, AU - Roome,Chris, AU - Shearer,James, AU - Lang,Iain A, AU - Stein,Ken, PY - 2012/10/18/entrez PY - 2012/10/18/pubmed PY - 2013/11/13/medline SP - 1157 EP - 71 JF - PharmacoEconomics JO - Pharmacoeconomics VL - 30 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Spasticity is common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and is a major contributor to disability. Sativex®, an oromucosal spray containing cannabis-based medicinal products, has been found to be effective in reducing spasticity symptoms. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to estimate the cost effectiveness of Sativex® plus oral anti-spasticity medicines compared with the current standard treatment for moderate or severe spasticity in MS in the UK. METHODS: A Markov model was used to assess the costs and benefits of Sativex® plus oral anti-spasticity medicines or current standard treatment based on their effects on the quality of life of patients. The main outcome was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) in terms of costs per additional QALY gained over 5 years of treatment. One-way, multi-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to explore the impact of uncertainties on the findings. RESULTS: In the base case, Sativex® plus oral anti-spasticity medicines resulted in incremental costs of £7600 and a QALY gain of 0.15 per person over 5 years (ICER = £49 300 per QALY).[year 2009 data for costs]. Findings were sensitive to the costs of Sativex® (price and dose) and differences in utilities between responders and non-responders. CONCLUSIONS: Using a willingness-to-pay threshold of £30 000 per QALY, Sativex® appears unlikely to be considered cost effective by UK funders of healthcare for spasticity in MS. This is unfortunate, since it appears that Sativex® use is likely to benefit some patients in the management of this common consequence of MS. SN - 1179-2027 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23072659/Cost_effectiveness_of_oromucosal_cannabis_based_medicine__Sativex®__for_spasticity_in_multiple_sclerosis_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2165/11598470-000000000-00000 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -