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Neuroimaging for the evaluation of chronic headaches: an evidence-based analysis.
Ont Health Technol Assess Ser 2010; 10(26):1-57OH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The objectives of this evidence based review are: i) To determine the effectiveness of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in the evaluation of persons with a chronic headache and a normal neurological examination.ii) To determine the comparative effectiveness of CT and MRI scans for detecting significant intracranial abnormalities in persons with chronic headache and a normal neurological exam.iii) To determine the budget impact of CT and MRI scans for persons with a chronic headache and a normal neurological exam.

CLINICAL NEED

CONDITION AND TARGET POPULATION Headaches disorders are generally classified as either primary or secondary with further sub-classifications into specific headache types. Primary headaches are those not caused by a disease or medical condition and include i) tension-type headache, ii) migraine, iii) cluster headache and, iv) other primary headaches, such as hemicrania continua and new daily persistent headache. Secondary headaches include those headaches caused by an underlying medical condition. While primary headaches disorders are far more frequent than secondary headache disorders, there is an urge to carry out neuroimaging studies (CT and/or MRI scans) out of fear of missing uncommon secondary causes and often to relieve patient anxiety. Tension type headaches are the most common primary headache disorder and migraines are the most common severe primary headache disorder. Cluster headaches are a type of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia and are less common than migraines and tension type headaches. Chronic headaches are defined as headaches present for at least 3 months and lasting greater than or equal to 15 days per month. The International Classification of Headache Disorders states that for most secondary headaches the characteristics of the headache are poorly described in the literature and for those headache disorders where it is well described there are few diagnostically important features. The global prevalence of headache in general in the adult population is estimated at 46%, for tension-type headache it is 42% and 11% for migraine headache. The estimated prevalence of cluster headaches is 0.1% or 1 in 1000 persons. The prevalence of chronic daily headache is estimated at 3%.

NEUROIMAGING

COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY: Computed tomography (CT) is a medical imaging technique used to aid diagnosis and to guide interventional and therapeutic procedures. It allows rapid acquisition of high-resolution three-dimensional images, providing radiologists and other physicians with cross-sectional views of a person's anatomy. CT scanning poses risk of radiation exposure. The radiation exposure from a conventional CT scanner may emit effective doses of 2-4mSv for a typical head CT. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique used to aid diagnosis but unlike CT it does not use ionizing radiation. Instead, it uses a strong magnetic field to image a person's anatomy. Compared to CT, MRI can provide increased contrast between the soft tissues of the body. Because of the persistent magnetic field, extra care is required in the magnetic resonance environment to ensure that injury or harm does not come to any personnel while in the environment.

RESEARCH QUESTIONS

What is the effectiveness of CT and MRI scanning in the evaluation of persons with a chronic headache and a normal neurological examination?What is the comparative effectiveness of CT and MRI scanning for detecting significant intracranial abnormality in persons with chronic headache and a normal neurological exam?What is the budget impact of CT and MRI scans for persons with a chronic headache and a normal neurological exam.

INCLUSION CRITERIA

Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, observational studiesOutpatient adult population with chronic headache and normal neurological examStudies reporting likelihood ratio of clinical variables for a significant intracranial abnormalityEnglish language studies2005-present

EXCLUSION CRITERIA

Studies which report outcomes for persons with seizures, focal symptoms, recent/new onset headache, change in presentation, thunderclap headache, and headache due to traumaPersons with abnormal neurological examinationCase reports

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23074404

Citation

Medical Advisory Secretariat. "Neuroimaging for the Evaluation of Chronic Headaches: an Evidence-based Analysis." Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series, vol. 10, no. 26, 2010, pp. 1-57.
Medical Advisory Secretariat. Neuroimaging for the evaluation of chronic headaches: an evidence-based analysis. Ont Health Technol Assess Ser. 2010;10(26):1-57.
Medical Advisory Secretariat. (2010). Neuroimaging for the evaluation of chronic headaches: an evidence-based analysis. Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series, 10(26), pp. 1-57.
Medical Advisory Secretariat. Neuroimaging for the Evaluation of Chronic Headaches: an Evidence-based Analysis. Ont Health Technol Assess Ser. 2010;10(26):1-57. PubMed PMID: 23074404.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neuroimaging for the evaluation of chronic headaches: an evidence-based analysis. A1 - ,, Y1 - 2010/12/01/ PY - 2012/10/18/entrez PY - 2010/1/1/pubmed PY - 2010/1/1/medline SP - 1 EP - 57 JF - Ontario health technology assessment series JO - Ont Health Technol Assess Ser VL - 10 IS - 26 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this evidence based review are: i) To determine the effectiveness of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in the evaluation of persons with a chronic headache and a normal neurological examination.ii) To determine the comparative effectiveness of CT and MRI scans for detecting significant intracranial abnormalities in persons with chronic headache and a normal neurological exam.iii) To determine the budget impact of CT and MRI scans for persons with a chronic headache and a normal neurological exam. CLINICAL NEED: CONDITION AND TARGET POPULATION Headaches disorders are generally classified as either primary or secondary with further sub-classifications into specific headache types. Primary headaches are those not caused by a disease or medical condition and include i) tension-type headache, ii) migraine, iii) cluster headache and, iv) other primary headaches, such as hemicrania continua and new daily persistent headache. Secondary headaches include those headaches caused by an underlying medical condition. While primary headaches disorders are far more frequent than secondary headache disorders, there is an urge to carry out neuroimaging studies (CT and/or MRI scans) out of fear of missing uncommon secondary causes and often to relieve patient anxiety. Tension type headaches are the most common primary headache disorder and migraines are the most common severe primary headache disorder. Cluster headaches are a type of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia and are less common than migraines and tension type headaches. Chronic headaches are defined as headaches present for at least 3 months and lasting greater than or equal to 15 days per month. The International Classification of Headache Disorders states that for most secondary headaches the characteristics of the headache are poorly described in the literature and for those headache disorders where it is well described there are few diagnostically important features. The global prevalence of headache in general in the adult population is estimated at 46%, for tension-type headache it is 42% and 11% for migraine headache. The estimated prevalence of cluster headaches is 0.1% or 1 in 1000 persons. The prevalence of chronic daily headache is estimated at 3%. NEUROIMAGING: COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY: Computed tomography (CT) is a medical imaging technique used to aid diagnosis and to guide interventional and therapeutic procedures. It allows rapid acquisition of high-resolution three-dimensional images, providing radiologists and other physicians with cross-sectional views of a person's anatomy. CT scanning poses risk of radiation exposure. The radiation exposure from a conventional CT scanner may emit effective doses of 2-4mSv for a typical head CT. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique used to aid diagnosis but unlike CT it does not use ionizing radiation. Instead, it uses a strong magnetic field to image a person's anatomy. Compared to CT, MRI can provide increased contrast between the soft tissues of the body. Because of the persistent magnetic field, extra care is required in the magnetic resonance environment to ensure that injury or harm does not come to any personnel while in the environment. RESEARCH QUESTIONS: What is the effectiveness of CT and MRI scanning in the evaluation of persons with a chronic headache and a normal neurological examination?What is the comparative effectiveness of CT and MRI scanning for detecting significant intracranial abnormality in persons with chronic headache and a normal neurological exam?What is the budget impact of CT and MRI scans for persons with a chronic headache and a normal neurological exam. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, observational studiesOutpatient adult population with chronic headache and normal neurological examStudies reporting likelihood ratio of clinical variables for a significant intracranial abnormalityEnglish language studies2005-present EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Studies which report outcomes for persons with seizures, focal symptoms, recent/new onset headache, change in presentation, thunderclap headache, and headache due to traumaPersons with abnormal neurological examinationCase reports SN - 1915-7398 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23074404/Neuroimaging_for_the_evaluation_of_chronic_headaches:_an_evidence_based_analysis_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/23074404/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -