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Community-based care for chronic wound management: an evidence-based analysis.

Abstract

In August 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) presented a vignette to the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee (OHTAC) on a proposed targeted health care delivery model for chronic care. The proposed model was defined as multidisciplinary, ambulatory, community-based care that bridged the gap between primary and tertiary care, and was intended for individuals with a chronic disease who were at risk of a hospital admission or emergency department visit. The goals of this care model were thought to include: the prevention of emergency department visits, a reduction in hospital admissions and re-admissions, facilitation of earlier hospital discharge, a reduction or delay in long-term care admissions, and an improvement in mortality and other disease-specific patient outcomes.OHTAC approved the development of an evidence-based assessment to determine the effectiveness of specialized community based care for the management of heart failure, Type 2 diabetes and chronic wounds.PLEASE VISIT THE MEDICAL ADVISORY SECRETARIAT WEB SITE AT: www.health.gov.on.ca/ohtas to review the following reports associated with the Specialized Multidisciplinary Community-Based care series.Specialized multidisciplinary community-based care series: a summary of evidence-based analysesCommunity-based care for the specialized management of heart failure: an evidence-based analysisCommunity-based care for chronic wound management: an evidence-based analysisPlease note that the evidence-based analysis of specialized community-based care for the management of diabetes titled: "Community-based care for the management of type 2 diabetes: an evidence-based analysis" has been published as part of the Diabetes Strategy Evidence Platform at this URL: http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/ohtas/tech_diabetes_20091020.htmlPLEASE VISIT THE TORONTO HEALTH ECONOMICS AND TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT COLLABORATIVE WEB SITE AT: http://theta.utoronto.ca/papers/MAS_CHF_Clinics_Report.pdf to review the following economic project associated with this series:Community-based Care for the specialized management of heart failure: a cost-effectiveness and budget impact analysis.

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this evidence-based review is to determine the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary wound care team for the management of chronic wounds.

CLINICAL NEED

CONDITION AND TARGET POPULATION Chronic wounds develop from various aetiologies including pressure, diabetes, venous pathology, and surgery. A pressure ulcer is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused, alone or in combination, by pressure, shear, or friction. Up to three fifths of venous leg ulcers are due to venous aetiology. Approximately 1.5 million Ontarians will sustain a pressure ulcer, 111,000 will develop a diabetic foot ulcer, and between 80,000 and 130,000 will develop a venous leg ulcer. Up to 65% of those afflicted by chronic leg ulcers report experiencing decreased quality of life, restricted mobility, anxiety, depression, and/or severe or continuous pain. MULTIDISCIPLINARY WOUND CARE TEAMS: The term 'multidisciplinary' refers to multiple disciplines on a team and 'interdisciplinary' to such a team functioning in a coordinated and collaborative manner. There is general consensus that a group of multidisciplinary professionals is necessary for optimum specialist management of chronic wounds stemming from all aetiologies. However, there is little evidence to guide the decision of which professionals might be needed form an optimal wound care team.

INCLUSION CRITERIA

Randomized controlled trials and Controlled clinical Trials (CCT)Systematic review with meta analysisPopulation includes persons with pressure ulcers (anywhere) and/or leg and foot ulcersThe intervention includes a multidisciplinary (two or more disciplines) wound care team.The control group does not receive care by a wound care teamStudies published in the English language between 2004 and 2009 EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Single centre retrospective observational studies

OUTCOMES OF INTEREST

Proportion of persons and/or wounds completely healedTime to complete healingQuality of LifePain assessment

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS

Two studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, one a randomized controlled trial (RCT), the other a CCT using a before and after study design. There was variation in the setting, composition of the wound care team, outcome measures, and follow up periods between the studies. In both studies, however, the wound care team members received training in wound care management and followed a wound care management protocol. In the RCT, Vu et al. reported a non-significant difference between the proportion of wounds healed in 6 months using a univariate analysis (61.7% for treatment vs. 52.5% for control; p=0.074, RR=1.19) There was also a non-significant difference in the mean time to healing in days (82 for treatment vs. 101 for control; p=0.095). More persons in the intervention group had a Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) score equal to zero (better pain control) at 6 months when compared with the control group (38.6% for intervention vs. 24.4% for control; p=0.017, RR=1.58). By multivariate analysis a statistically significant hazard ratio was reported in the intervention group (1.73, 95% CI 1.20-1.50; p=0.003). In the CCT, Harrison et al. reported a statistically significant difference in healing rates between the pre (control) and post (intervention) phases of the study. Of patients in the pre phase, 23% had healed ulcers 3 months after study enrolment, whereas 56% were healed in the post phase (P<0.001, OR=4.17) (Figure 3). Furthermore, 27% of patients were treated daily or more often in the pre phase whereas only 6% were treated at this frequency in the post phase (P<0.001), equal to a 34% relative risk reduction in frequency of daily treatments. The authors did not report the results of pain relief assessment. The body of evidence was assessed using the GRADE methodology for 4 outcomes: proportion of wounds healed, proportion of persons with healed wounds, wound associated pain relief, and proportion of persons needing daily wound treatments. In general, the evidence was found to be low to very low quality.

CONCLUSION

The evidence supports that managing chronic wounds with a multidisciplinary wound care team significantly increases wound healing and reduces the severity of wound-associated pain and the required daily wound treatments compared to persons not managed by a wound care team. The quality of evidence supporting these outcomes is low to very low meaning that further research is very likely to have an important impact on our confidence in the estimate of effect and is likely to change the estimate.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23074522

Citation

Medical Advisory Secretariat. "Community-based Care for Chronic Wound Management: an Evidence-based Analysis." Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series, vol. 9, no. 18, 2009, pp. 1-24.
Medical Advisory Secretariat. Community-based care for chronic wound management: an evidence-based analysis. Ont Health Technol Assess Ser. 2009;9(18):1-24.
Medical Advisory Secretariat. (2009). Community-based care for chronic wound management: an evidence-based analysis. Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series, 9(18), pp. 1-24.
Medical Advisory Secretariat. Community-based Care for Chronic Wound Management: an Evidence-based Analysis. Ont Health Technol Assess Ser. 2009;9(18):1-24. PubMed PMID: 23074522.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Community-based care for chronic wound management: an evidence-based analysis. A1 - ,, Y1 - 2009/11/01/ PY - 2012/10/18/entrez PY - 2009/1/1/pubmed PY - 2009/1/1/medline SP - 1 EP - 24 JF - Ontario health technology assessment series JO - Ont Health Technol Assess Ser VL - 9 IS - 18 N2 - UNLABELLED: In August 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) presented a vignette to the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee (OHTAC) on a proposed targeted health care delivery model for chronic care. The proposed model was defined as multidisciplinary, ambulatory, community-based care that bridged the gap between primary and tertiary care, and was intended for individuals with a chronic disease who were at risk of a hospital admission or emergency department visit. The goals of this care model were thought to include: the prevention of emergency department visits, a reduction in hospital admissions and re-admissions, facilitation of earlier hospital discharge, a reduction or delay in long-term care admissions, and an improvement in mortality and other disease-specific patient outcomes.OHTAC approved the development of an evidence-based assessment to determine the effectiveness of specialized community based care for the management of heart failure, Type 2 diabetes and chronic wounds.PLEASE VISIT THE MEDICAL ADVISORY SECRETARIAT WEB SITE AT: www.health.gov.on.ca/ohtas to review the following reports associated with the Specialized Multidisciplinary Community-Based care series.Specialized multidisciplinary community-based care series: a summary of evidence-based analysesCommunity-based care for the specialized management of heart failure: an evidence-based analysisCommunity-based care for chronic wound management: an evidence-based analysisPlease note that the evidence-based analysis of specialized community-based care for the management of diabetes titled: "Community-based care for the management of type 2 diabetes: an evidence-based analysis" has been published as part of the Diabetes Strategy Evidence Platform at this URL: http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/ohtas/tech_diabetes_20091020.htmlPLEASE VISIT THE TORONTO HEALTH ECONOMICS AND TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT COLLABORATIVE WEB SITE AT: http://theta.utoronto.ca/papers/MAS_CHF_Clinics_Report.pdf to review the following economic project associated with this series:Community-based Care for the specialized management of heart failure: a cost-effectiveness and budget impact analysis. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this evidence-based review is to determine the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary wound care team for the management of chronic wounds. CLINICAL NEED: CONDITION AND TARGET POPULATION Chronic wounds develop from various aetiologies including pressure, diabetes, venous pathology, and surgery. A pressure ulcer is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused, alone or in combination, by pressure, shear, or friction. Up to three fifths of venous leg ulcers are due to venous aetiology. Approximately 1.5 million Ontarians will sustain a pressure ulcer, 111,000 will develop a diabetic foot ulcer, and between 80,000 and 130,000 will develop a venous leg ulcer. Up to 65% of those afflicted by chronic leg ulcers report experiencing decreased quality of life, restricted mobility, anxiety, depression, and/or severe or continuous pain. MULTIDISCIPLINARY WOUND CARE TEAMS: The term 'multidisciplinary' refers to multiple disciplines on a team and 'interdisciplinary' to such a team functioning in a coordinated and collaborative manner. There is general consensus that a group of multidisciplinary professionals is necessary for optimum specialist management of chronic wounds stemming from all aetiologies. However, there is little evidence to guide the decision of which professionals might be needed form an optimal wound care team. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials and Controlled clinical Trials (CCT)Systematic review with meta analysisPopulation includes persons with pressure ulcers (anywhere) and/or leg and foot ulcersThe intervention includes a multidisciplinary (two or more disciplines) wound care team.The control group does not receive care by a wound care teamStudies published in the English language between 2004 and 2009 EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Single centre retrospective observational studies OUTCOMES OF INTEREST: Proportion of persons and/or wounds completely healedTime to complete healingQuality of LifePain assessment SUMMARY OF FINDINGS: Two studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, one a randomized controlled trial (RCT), the other a CCT using a before and after study design. There was variation in the setting, composition of the wound care team, outcome measures, and follow up periods between the studies. In both studies, however, the wound care team members received training in wound care management and followed a wound care management protocol. In the RCT, Vu et al. reported a non-significant difference between the proportion of wounds healed in 6 months using a univariate analysis (61.7% for treatment vs. 52.5% for control; p=0.074, RR=1.19) There was also a non-significant difference in the mean time to healing in days (82 for treatment vs. 101 for control; p=0.095). More persons in the intervention group had a Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) score equal to zero (better pain control) at 6 months when compared with the control group (38.6% for intervention vs. 24.4% for control; p=0.017, RR=1.58). By multivariate analysis a statistically significant hazard ratio was reported in the intervention group (1.73, 95% CI 1.20-1.50; p=0.003). In the CCT, Harrison et al. reported a statistically significant difference in healing rates between the pre (control) and post (intervention) phases of the study. Of patients in the pre phase, 23% had healed ulcers 3 months after study enrolment, whereas 56% were healed in the post phase (P<0.001, OR=4.17) (Figure 3). Furthermore, 27% of patients were treated daily or more often in the pre phase whereas only 6% were treated at this frequency in the post phase (P<0.001), equal to a 34% relative risk reduction in frequency of daily treatments. The authors did not report the results of pain relief assessment. The body of evidence was assessed using the GRADE methodology for 4 outcomes: proportion of wounds healed, proportion of persons with healed wounds, wound associated pain relief, and proportion of persons needing daily wound treatments. In general, the evidence was found to be low to very low quality. CONCLUSION: The evidence supports that managing chronic wounds with a multidisciplinary wound care team significantly increases wound healing and reduces the severity of wound-associated pain and the required daily wound treatments compared to persons not managed by a wound care team. The quality of evidence supporting these outcomes is low to very low meaning that further research is very likely to have an important impact on our confidence in the estimate of effect and is likely to change the estimate. SN - 1915-7398 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23074522/Community_based_care_for_chronic_wound_management:_an_evidence_based_analysis_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/23074522/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -