Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Glycerol use in hyperhydration and rehydration: scientific update.
Med Sport Sci. 2012; 59:104-112.MS

Abstract

Glycerol ingestion creates an osmotic drive that enhances fluid retention. The major practical applications for athletes are to either (i) hyperhydrate before exercise so that they have more fluid to be lost as sweat during subsequent performance, thereby delaying the progression of dehydration from becoming physiologically significant, or (ii) improve both the rate of rehydration and total fluid retention following exercise. Recently we showed that rehydration may be improved further by combining glycerol with intravenous fluids. Improvements in endurance time, time trial performance and total power and work output have been seen during exercise following glycerol-induced hyperhydration or rehydration. Another recent trial showed that the increased body weight associated with the extra fluid does not inadvertently affect running economy. Concerns that the haemodilution associated with the fluid retention in the vascular space may be sufficient to mask illegal doping practices by athletes led the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) to add glycerol to its list of prohibited substances in 2010. Recent evidence suggests that doses of > 0.032 ± 0.010 g/kg lean body mass (much lower than those required for rehydration) will result in urinary excretion that may be detectable, so athletes under the WADA jurisdiction should be cautious to limit their inadvertent glycerol intake.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23075560

Citation

van Rosendal, S P., and J S. Coombes. "Glycerol Use in Hyperhydration and Rehydration: Scientific Update." Medicine and Sport Science, vol. 59, 2012, pp. 104-112.
van Rosendal SP, Coombes JS. Glycerol use in hyperhydration and rehydration: scientific update. Med Sport Sci. 2012;59:104-112.
van Rosendal, S. P., & Coombes, J. S. (2012). Glycerol use in hyperhydration and rehydration: scientific update. Medicine and Sport Science, 59, 104-112. https://doi.org/10.1159/000341959
van Rosendal SP, Coombes JS. Glycerol Use in Hyperhydration and Rehydration: Scientific Update. Med Sport Sci. 2012;59:104-112. PubMed PMID: 23075560.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Glycerol use in hyperhydration and rehydration: scientific update. AU - van Rosendal,S P, AU - Coombes,J S, Y1 - 2012/10/15/ PY - 2012/10/19/entrez PY - 2012/10/19/pubmed PY - 2013/4/4/medline SP - 104 EP - 112 JF - Medicine and sport science JO - Med Sport Sci VL - 59 N2 - Glycerol ingestion creates an osmotic drive that enhances fluid retention. The major practical applications for athletes are to either (i) hyperhydrate before exercise so that they have more fluid to be lost as sweat during subsequent performance, thereby delaying the progression of dehydration from becoming physiologically significant, or (ii) improve both the rate of rehydration and total fluid retention following exercise. Recently we showed that rehydration may be improved further by combining glycerol with intravenous fluids. Improvements in endurance time, time trial performance and total power and work output have been seen during exercise following glycerol-induced hyperhydration or rehydration. Another recent trial showed that the increased body weight associated with the extra fluid does not inadvertently affect running economy. Concerns that the haemodilution associated with the fluid retention in the vascular space may be sufficient to mask illegal doping practices by athletes led the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) to add glycerol to its list of prohibited substances in 2010. Recent evidence suggests that doses of > 0.032 ± 0.010 g/kg lean body mass (much lower than those required for rehydration) will result in urinary excretion that may be detectable, so athletes under the WADA jurisdiction should be cautious to limit their inadvertent glycerol intake. SN - 1662-2812 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23075560/Glycerol_use_in_hyperhydration_and_rehydration:_scientific_update_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000341959 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -