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Guilt, shame, and suicidal ideation in a military outpatient clinical sample.
Depress Anxiety. 2013 Jan; 30(1):55-60.DA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Increased suicide risk among US military personnel is a growing concern. Research has linked trauma exposure, including exposure to combat-related injuries, death, and atrocities to suicidal ideation among combat veterans. Guilt (feeling bad about what you did to another) and shame (feeling bad about who you are) have been proposed as potential contributors to suicidal ideation among military personnel, but have not yet received much empirical attention.

METHODS

Sixty-nine active duty military personnel receiving outpatient mental health treatment at a military clinic completed self-report symptom measures of guilt, shame, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and suicidal ideation while engaged in treatment. Generalized linear regression modeling was utilized to test the association of guilt and shame with suicidal ideation.

RESULTS

Mean levels of guilt and shame were significantly higher among military personnel with a history of suicidal ideation. Guilt (B = 0.203, SE = .046, P < .001) and shame (B = 0.111, SE = .037, P = .002) were independently associated with severity of current suicidal ideation above and beyond the effects of depression, PTSD symptoms, and the depression-by-PTSD interaction, and fully mediated the relationships of depression and PTSD symptom severity with suicidal ideation. When considered simultaneously, only guilt (B = 0.167, SE = .053, P = .001) was significantly associated with increased suicidal ideation.

CONCLUSIONS

Guilt and shame are associated with increased severity of suicidal ideation in military mental health outpatients. Guilt has a particularly strong relationship with suicidal ideation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Center for Veterans Studies, The University of Utah, 260 S. Central Campus Dr., Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. craig.bryan@utah.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23077111

Citation

Bryan, Craig J., et al. "Guilt, Shame, and Suicidal Ideation in a Military Outpatient Clinical Sample." Depression and Anxiety, vol. 30, no. 1, 2013, pp. 55-60.
Bryan CJ, Morrow CE, Etienne N, et al. Guilt, shame, and suicidal ideation in a military outpatient clinical sample. Depress Anxiety. 2013;30(1):55-60.
Bryan, C. J., Morrow, C. E., Etienne, N., & Ray-Sannerud, B. (2013). Guilt, shame, and suicidal ideation in a military outpatient clinical sample. Depression and Anxiety, 30(1), 55-60. https://doi.org/10.1002/da.22002
Bryan CJ, et al. Guilt, Shame, and Suicidal Ideation in a Military Outpatient Clinical Sample. Depress Anxiety. 2013;30(1):55-60. PubMed PMID: 23077111.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Guilt, shame, and suicidal ideation in a military outpatient clinical sample. AU - Bryan,Craig J, AU - Morrow,Chad E, AU - Etienne,Neysa, AU - Ray-Sannerud,Bobbie, Y1 - 2012/10/17/ PY - 2012/06/29/received PY - 2012/08/30/revised PY - 2012/08/30/accepted PY - 2012/10/19/entrez PY - 2012/10/19/pubmed PY - 2013/6/21/medline SP - 55 EP - 60 JF - Depression and anxiety JO - Depress Anxiety VL - 30 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Increased suicide risk among US military personnel is a growing concern. Research has linked trauma exposure, including exposure to combat-related injuries, death, and atrocities to suicidal ideation among combat veterans. Guilt (feeling bad about what you did to another) and shame (feeling bad about who you are) have been proposed as potential contributors to suicidal ideation among military personnel, but have not yet received much empirical attention. METHODS: Sixty-nine active duty military personnel receiving outpatient mental health treatment at a military clinic completed self-report symptom measures of guilt, shame, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and suicidal ideation while engaged in treatment. Generalized linear regression modeling was utilized to test the association of guilt and shame with suicidal ideation. RESULTS: Mean levels of guilt and shame were significantly higher among military personnel with a history of suicidal ideation. Guilt (B = 0.203, SE = .046, P < .001) and shame (B = 0.111, SE = .037, P = .002) were independently associated with severity of current suicidal ideation above and beyond the effects of depression, PTSD symptoms, and the depression-by-PTSD interaction, and fully mediated the relationships of depression and PTSD symptom severity with suicidal ideation. When considered simultaneously, only guilt (B = 0.167, SE = .053, P = .001) was significantly associated with increased suicidal ideation. CONCLUSIONS: Guilt and shame are associated with increased severity of suicidal ideation in military mental health outpatients. Guilt has a particularly strong relationship with suicidal ideation. SN - 1520-6394 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23077111/Guilt_shame_and_suicidal_ideation_in_a_military_outpatient_clinical_sample_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/da.22002 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -