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Gastric foreign body as a risk factor for gastric dilatation and volvulus in dogs.
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2012 Nov 01; 241(9):1190-3.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate whether the presence of a gastric foreign body (gFB) is a significant risk factor for gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV) in dogs and to quantify the change in likelihood of developing GDV associated with the presence of a gFB.

DESIGN

Retrospective case-control study.

ANIMALS

118 large- or giant-breed dogs treated surgically for an episode of GDV and 342 large- or giant-breed dogs (> 12 months old) that underwent abdominal surgery for reasons other than GDV.

PROCEDURES

During exploratory celiotomy, all dogs underwent palpation and visual examination of the entire gastrointestinal tract. A foreign body was defined as nondigestible or slowly digestible material palpated during gastrointestinal tract examination that was causing clinical signs or was > 10 cm in length or > 2 cm in width.

RESULTS

The incidence of gFBs was significantly higher in the group of dogs with GDV. The presence of a gFB, age, weight, and purebred status were significant risk factors for GDV. Odds ratios were calculated for gFB (OR, 4.920), age (OR, 1.157), weight (OR, 0.958) and purebred status (OR, 4.836).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Gastric foreign body was found to be a significant risk factor for GDV in dogs. The study findings suggested that a large- or giant-breed dog with a gFB was approximately 5 times as likely to develop GDV as a similar dog with no gFB. Results indicated that there was a strong correlation between gFB and GDV in dogs. However, further cohort studies are needed to determine whether there is a causal relationship between the presence of a gFB and the development of GDV in dogs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Bristol Veterinary School, Bristol University, Langford, Bristol BS40 5DU, England.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23078566

Citation

de Battisti, Anna, et al. "Gastric Foreign Body as a Risk Factor for Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus in Dogs." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 241, no. 9, 2012, pp. 1190-3.
de Battisti A, Toscano MJ, Formaggini L. Gastric foreign body as a risk factor for gastric dilatation and volvulus in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2012;241(9):1190-3.
de Battisti, A., Toscano, M. J., & Formaggini, L. (2012). Gastric foreign body as a risk factor for gastric dilatation and volvulus in dogs. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 241(9), 1190-3. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.241.9.1190
de Battisti A, Toscano MJ, Formaggini L. Gastric Foreign Body as a Risk Factor for Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus in Dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2012 Nov 1;241(9):1190-3. PubMed PMID: 23078566.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gastric foreign body as a risk factor for gastric dilatation and volvulus in dogs. AU - de Battisti,Anna, AU - Toscano,Michael J, AU - Formaggini,Luca, PY - 2012/10/20/entrez PY - 2012/10/20/pubmed PY - 2013/4/4/medline SP - 1190 EP - 3 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J Am Vet Med Assoc VL - 241 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the presence of a gastric foreign body (gFB) is a significant risk factor for gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV) in dogs and to quantify the change in likelihood of developing GDV associated with the presence of a gFB. DESIGN: Retrospective case-control study. ANIMALS: 118 large- or giant-breed dogs treated surgically for an episode of GDV and 342 large- or giant-breed dogs (> 12 months old) that underwent abdominal surgery for reasons other than GDV. PROCEDURES: During exploratory celiotomy, all dogs underwent palpation and visual examination of the entire gastrointestinal tract. A foreign body was defined as nondigestible or slowly digestible material palpated during gastrointestinal tract examination that was causing clinical signs or was > 10 cm in length or > 2 cm in width. RESULTS: The incidence of gFBs was significantly higher in the group of dogs with GDV. The presence of a gFB, age, weight, and purebred status were significant risk factors for GDV. Odds ratios were calculated for gFB (OR, 4.920), age (OR, 1.157), weight (OR, 0.958) and purebred status (OR, 4.836). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Gastric foreign body was found to be a significant risk factor for GDV in dogs. The study findings suggested that a large- or giant-breed dog with a gFB was approximately 5 times as likely to develop GDV as a similar dog with no gFB. Results indicated that there was a strong correlation between gFB and GDV in dogs. However, further cohort studies are needed to determine whether there is a causal relationship between the presence of a gFB and the development of GDV in dogs. SN - 1943-569X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23078566/Gastric_foreign_body_as_a_risk_factor_for_gastric_dilatation_and_volvulus_in_dogs_ L2 - https://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/10.2460/javma.241.9.1190?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -