Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Field-to-laboratory transport protocol impacts subsequent physiological biomarker response in the marine mussel, Perna canaliculus.

Abstract

The transfer of mussels from field to laboratory, or transplantation between clean and contaminated field settings, is a common protocol in ecotoxicology. However, collection and transport of mussels could lead to stress that may impact biomarker responses, and thus confound interpretation of results. Physiological responses (clearance rate, absorption efficiency, excretion rate, respiration rate and scope-for-growth) of green-lipped mussels (Perna canaliculus) exposed to four different transportation protocols were investigated. These protocols included immersion in site seawater (SSW), immersion in artificial seawater (ASW), and emersion (aerial transport; EMS) at two temperatures (15°C and 5°C). Physiological measurements were conducted after a simulated 24h "transport" phase and a 48h "recovery" phase. Clearance rates were significantly inhibited by the EMS 5°C and ASW protocols relative to SSW treatment, although the clearance rate of the latter recovered after 48h. A similar pattern was observed for excretion and respiration rates for ASW. Decreased excretion rates for EMS 15°C and respiration rates for EMS 5°C were also recorded relative to values for SSW following "recovery". Negative scope-for-growth was observed for all treatments except EMS 15°C. These data suggest transport emersed at ambient air temperatures is the best method to maintain physiological health of green-lipped mussels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand. rch118@uclive.ac.nzNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23085018

Citation

Chandurvelan, Rathishri, et al. "Field-to-laboratory Transport Protocol Impacts Subsequent Physiological Biomarker Response in the Marine Mussel, Perna Canaliculus." Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology, vol. 164, no. 1, 2013, pp. 84-90.
Chandurvelan R, Marsden ID, Gaw S, et al. Field-to-laboratory transport protocol impacts subsequent physiological biomarker response in the marine mussel, Perna canaliculus. Comp Biochem Physiol, Part A Mol Integr Physiol. 2013;164(1):84-90.
Chandurvelan, R., Marsden, I. D., Gaw, S., & Glover, C. N. (2013). Field-to-laboratory transport protocol impacts subsequent physiological biomarker response in the marine mussel, Perna canaliculus. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology, 164(1), 84-90. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2012.10.011
Chandurvelan R, et al. Field-to-laboratory Transport Protocol Impacts Subsequent Physiological Biomarker Response in the Marine Mussel, Perna Canaliculus. Comp Biochem Physiol, Part A Mol Integr Physiol. 2013;164(1):84-90. PubMed PMID: 23085018.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Field-to-laboratory transport protocol impacts subsequent physiological biomarker response in the marine mussel, Perna canaliculus. AU - Chandurvelan,Rathishri, AU - Marsden,Islay D, AU - Gaw,Sally, AU - Glover,Chris N, Y1 - 2012/10/18/ PY - 2012/08/24/received PY - 2012/10/10/revised PY - 2012/10/10/accepted PY - 2012/10/23/entrez PY - 2012/10/23/pubmed PY - 2013/5/10/medline SP - 84 EP - 90 JF - Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A, Molecular & integrative physiology JO - Comp. Biochem. Physiol., Part A Mol. Integr. Physiol. VL - 164 IS - 1 N2 - The transfer of mussels from field to laboratory, or transplantation between clean and contaminated field settings, is a common protocol in ecotoxicology. However, collection and transport of mussels could lead to stress that may impact biomarker responses, and thus confound interpretation of results. Physiological responses (clearance rate, absorption efficiency, excretion rate, respiration rate and scope-for-growth) of green-lipped mussels (Perna canaliculus) exposed to four different transportation protocols were investigated. These protocols included immersion in site seawater (SSW), immersion in artificial seawater (ASW), and emersion (aerial transport; EMS) at two temperatures (15°C and 5°C). Physiological measurements were conducted after a simulated 24h "transport" phase and a 48h "recovery" phase. Clearance rates were significantly inhibited by the EMS 5°C and ASW protocols relative to SSW treatment, although the clearance rate of the latter recovered after 48h. A similar pattern was observed for excretion and respiration rates for ASW. Decreased excretion rates for EMS 15°C and respiration rates for EMS 5°C were also recorded relative to values for SSW following "recovery". Negative scope-for-growth was observed for all treatments except EMS 15°C. These data suggest transport emersed at ambient air temperatures is the best method to maintain physiological health of green-lipped mussels. SN - 1531-4332 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23085018/Field_to_laboratory_transport_protocol_impacts_subsequent_physiological_biomarker_response_in_the_marine_mussel_Perna_canaliculus_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1095-6433(12)00489-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -