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Alcohol drinking and all cancer mortality: a meta-analysis.
Ann Oncol 2013; 24(3):807-16AO

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Epidemiological studies have suggested an inconsistent relationship between alcohol drinking and risk of all cancer mortality. As far as we know, no meta-analysis has been conducted to explore this issue.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

We carried out a PubMed search to find relevant articles published before April 2012 in English. Categorical and dose-response meta-analyses were conducted to identify the impact of alcohol drinking on all cancer mortality. Potential sources of heterogeneity were detected by meta-regression and stratification analyses. Sensitivity and cumulative meta-analyses were also carried out.

RESULTS

Eighteen independent cohort studies met the inclusion criteria. Compared with non/occasional drinkers, the pooled relative risks (RRs) were 0.91 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-0.94] for light, 1.02 (95% CI 0.99-1.06) for moderate, and 1.31 (95% CI 1.23-1.39) for heavy drinkers. Former drinkers presented a higher risk (RR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.15-1.50) than current drinkers (RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.98-1.16). There was a J-shaped relationship between all cancer mortality and alcohol consumption in males but not in females.

CONCLUSIONS

This meta-analysis confirms the health hazards of heavy drinking (≥50 g/day) and benefits of light drinking (≤12.5 g/day). Large-sample, well-designed, prospective epidemiological studies, especially on heavy drinking among women, should be developed in future.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23104725

Citation

Jin, M, et al. "Alcohol Drinking and All Cancer Mortality: a Meta-analysis." Annals of Oncology : Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology, vol. 24, no. 3, 2013, pp. 807-16.
Jin M, Cai S, Guo J, et al. Alcohol drinking and all cancer mortality: a meta-analysis. Ann Oncol. 2013;24(3):807-16.
Jin, M., Cai, S., Guo, J., Zhu, Y., Li, M., Yu, Y., ... Chen, K. (2013). Alcohol drinking and all cancer mortality: a meta-analysis. Annals of Oncology : Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology, 24(3), pp. 807-16. doi:10.1093/annonc/mds508.
Jin M, et al. Alcohol Drinking and All Cancer Mortality: a Meta-analysis. Ann Oncol. 2013;24(3):807-16. PubMed PMID: 23104725.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol drinking and all cancer mortality: a meta-analysis. AU - Jin,M, AU - Cai,S, AU - Guo,J, AU - Zhu,Y, AU - Li,M, AU - Yu,Y, AU - Zhang,S, AU - Chen,K, Y1 - 2012/10/26/ PY - 2012/10/30/entrez PY - 2012/10/30/pubmed PY - 2013/7/31/medline SP - 807 EP - 16 JF - Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology JO - Ann. Oncol. VL - 24 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have suggested an inconsistent relationship between alcohol drinking and risk of all cancer mortality. As far as we know, no meta-analysis has been conducted to explore this issue. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We carried out a PubMed search to find relevant articles published before April 2012 in English. Categorical and dose-response meta-analyses were conducted to identify the impact of alcohol drinking on all cancer mortality. Potential sources of heterogeneity were detected by meta-regression and stratification analyses. Sensitivity and cumulative meta-analyses were also carried out. RESULTS: Eighteen independent cohort studies met the inclusion criteria. Compared with non/occasional drinkers, the pooled relative risks (RRs) were 0.91 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-0.94] for light, 1.02 (95% CI 0.99-1.06) for moderate, and 1.31 (95% CI 1.23-1.39) for heavy drinkers. Former drinkers presented a higher risk (RR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.15-1.50) than current drinkers (RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.98-1.16). There was a J-shaped relationship between all cancer mortality and alcohol consumption in males but not in females. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis confirms the health hazards of heavy drinking (≥50 g/day) and benefits of light drinking (≤12.5 g/day). Large-sample, well-designed, prospective epidemiological studies, especially on heavy drinking among women, should be developed in future. SN - 1569-8041 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23104725/Alcohol_drinking_and_all_cancer_mortality:_a_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/annonc/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/annonc/mds508 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -