Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Clinical characteristics, metabolic features, and phenotype of Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a large-scale case-control study.
Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2013 Mar; 287(3):525-31.AG

Abstract

AIM

The Rotterdam criteria extend the phenotypic spectrum of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The study was to investigate the clinical and biochemical features of a large-scale clinic based on the samples of Chinese women and to evaluate the value of Rotterdam criteria on Chinese PCOS women.

METHODS

One thousand four hundred and four Chinese women were involved in our study, among whom, 719 cases were diagnosed as PCOS based on 2003 Rotterdam criteria, and 685 women without history of hyperandrogenism and with regular menstrual cycles were recruited as control. Clinical features, ultrasonographic (ovarian follicle number and volume), hormonal and metabolic parameters were commenced as outcome measures.

RESULTS

Among 719 PCOS women, 6.1 % had hirsutism, 13.3 % had acne, 21.1 % had hyperandrogenism, 94.2 % had polycystic ovaries on ultrasonographic examination, and 88.6 % had menstrual abnormality. About one-third of the total PCOS patients were insulin resistant. The most frequent PCOS phenotype is the non-hyperandrogenic phenotype (O + P). Total testosterone, LH/FSH ratio, body mass index (BMI), and Ferriman and Gallwey scores (F-G) were all significantly higher in PCOS groups compared with non-PCOS group. Women with PCOS and obesity had higher serum testosterone, fasting insulin, longer menstrual cycle and larger ovarian follicle number, and LH/FSH ratio, estradiol or ovarian volume were similar between obese and normal BMI women. The LH level was statistically lower in the obese PCOS group.

CONCLUSIONS

Rotterdam criteria are generally applicable to Chinese population. Chinese women with PCOS showed lower rates of hyperandrogenemia, hirsutism, obesity, and insulin resistance. Obesity aggravates menstrual irregularity and increases the follicle number and serum total testosterone level.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gynecology, Tianjin Central Gynecology and Obstetrics Hospital, 165 San Ma Road, Nan Kai District, Tianjin 300100, China. zhanghongyuan830@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23108387

Citation

Zhang, Hong Yuan, et al. "Clinical Characteristics, Metabolic Features, and Phenotype of Chinese Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: a Large-scale Case-control Study." Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, vol. 287, no. 3, 2013, pp. 525-31.
Zhang HY, Guo CX, Zhu FF, et al. Clinical characteristics, metabolic features, and phenotype of Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a large-scale case-control study. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2013;287(3):525-31.
Zhang, H. Y., Guo, C. X., Zhu, F. F., Qu, P. P., Lin, W. J., & Xiong, J. (2013). Clinical characteristics, metabolic features, and phenotype of Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a large-scale case-control study. Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 287(3), 525-31. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00404-012-2568-z
Zhang HY, et al. Clinical Characteristics, Metabolic Features, and Phenotype of Chinese Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: a Large-scale Case-control Study. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2013;287(3):525-31. PubMed PMID: 23108387.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical characteristics, metabolic features, and phenotype of Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a large-scale case-control study. AU - Zhang,Hong Yuan, AU - Guo,Cheng Xiu, AU - Zhu,Fu Fan, AU - Qu,Peng Peng, AU - Lin,Wan Jun, AU - Xiong,Jing, Y1 - 2012/10/30/ PY - 2012/05/18/received PY - 2012/09/10/accepted PY - 2012/10/31/entrez PY - 2012/10/31/pubmed PY - 2013/8/8/medline SP - 525 EP - 31 JF - Archives of gynecology and obstetrics JO - Arch. Gynecol. Obstet. VL - 287 IS - 3 N2 - AIM: The Rotterdam criteria extend the phenotypic spectrum of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The study was to investigate the clinical and biochemical features of a large-scale clinic based on the samples of Chinese women and to evaluate the value of Rotterdam criteria on Chinese PCOS women. METHODS: One thousand four hundred and four Chinese women were involved in our study, among whom, 719 cases were diagnosed as PCOS based on 2003 Rotterdam criteria, and 685 women without history of hyperandrogenism and with regular menstrual cycles were recruited as control. Clinical features, ultrasonographic (ovarian follicle number and volume), hormonal and metabolic parameters were commenced as outcome measures. RESULTS: Among 719 PCOS women, 6.1 % had hirsutism, 13.3 % had acne, 21.1 % had hyperandrogenism, 94.2 % had polycystic ovaries on ultrasonographic examination, and 88.6 % had menstrual abnormality. About one-third of the total PCOS patients were insulin resistant. The most frequent PCOS phenotype is the non-hyperandrogenic phenotype (O + P). Total testosterone, LH/FSH ratio, body mass index (BMI), and Ferriman and Gallwey scores (F-G) were all significantly higher in PCOS groups compared with non-PCOS group. Women with PCOS and obesity had higher serum testosterone, fasting insulin, longer menstrual cycle and larger ovarian follicle number, and LH/FSH ratio, estradiol or ovarian volume were similar between obese and normal BMI women. The LH level was statistically lower in the obese PCOS group. CONCLUSIONS: Rotterdam criteria are generally applicable to Chinese population. Chinese women with PCOS showed lower rates of hyperandrogenemia, hirsutism, obesity, and insulin resistance. Obesity aggravates menstrual irregularity and increases the follicle number and serum total testosterone level. SN - 1432-0711 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23108387/Clinical_characteristics_metabolic_features_and_phenotype_of_Chinese_women_with_polycystic_ovary_syndrome:_a_large_scale_case_control_study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00404-012-2568-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -