Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Psychopathology in the aftermath of the Haiti earthquake: a population-based study of posttraumatic stress disorder and major depression.
Depress Anxiety. 2013 May; 30(5):413-24.DA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In the first population-based study of psychopathology conducted in Haiti, we documented earthquake-related experiences associated with risk for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) 2-4 months following the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

METHODS

A population-based survey was conducted of 1,323 survivors randomly selected from the general nondisplaced community, internally displaced persons camps, and a community clinic. Respondents were from the Nazon area of Port-au-Prince, ∼20 miles from the epicenter.

RESULTS

Respondents (90.5%) reported at least one relative/close friend injured/killed, 93% saw dead bodies, and 20.9% lost their job post-earthquake. The prevalence of PTSD (24.6%) and MDD (28.3%) was high. History of violent trauma was associated with risk of PTSD and MDD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.4, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-1.9; AOR, 1.7, 95% CI 1.3, 2.2, respectively). Low social support (AOR, 1.7, 95% CI 1.2, 2.3; AOR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0, 1.9, respectively) increased risk of PTSD and MDD among women. Suffering damage to the home increased risk of MDD in males (AOR 2.8, 95% CI 1.5, 5.5). Associations between being trapped in rubble, major damage to house, job loss, and PTSD; and participation in rescue/recovery, friends/family injured/killed, and MDD varied based on prior history of violent trauma.

CONCLUSIONS

Addressing mental health in a post-earthquake setting such as Haiti will require focusing resources on screening and treatment of identified vulnerable groups while targeting improvement of post-earthquake living conditions. Investment in sources of social support for women may make help mitigate the vulnerability of women to PTSD and MDD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. mc3226@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23124841

Citation

Cerdá, Magdalena, et al. "Psychopathology in the Aftermath of the Haiti Earthquake: a Population-based Study of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Major Depression." Depression and Anxiety, vol. 30, no. 5, 2013, pp. 413-24.
Cerdá M, Paczkowski M, Galea S, et al. Psychopathology in the aftermath of the Haiti earthquake: a population-based study of posttraumatic stress disorder and major depression. Depress Anxiety. 2013;30(5):413-24.
Cerdá, M., Paczkowski, M., Galea, S., Nemethy, K., Péan, C., & Desvarieux, M. (2013). Psychopathology in the aftermath of the Haiti earthquake: a population-based study of posttraumatic stress disorder and major depression. Depression and Anxiety, 30(5), 413-24. https://doi.org/10.1002/da.22007
Cerdá M, et al. Psychopathology in the Aftermath of the Haiti Earthquake: a Population-based Study of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Major Depression. Depress Anxiety. 2013;30(5):413-24. PubMed PMID: 23124841.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychopathology in the aftermath of the Haiti earthquake: a population-based study of posttraumatic stress disorder and major depression. AU - Cerdá,Magdalena, AU - Paczkowski,Magdalena, AU - Galea,Sandro, AU - Nemethy,Kevin, AU - Péan,Claude, AU - Desvarieux,Moïse, Y1 - 2012/11/01/ PY - 2012/07/02/received PY - 2012/08/13/revised PY - 2012/08/25/accepted PY - 2012/11/6/entrez PY - 2012/11/6/pubmed PY - 2013/12/27/medline SP - 413 EP - 24 JF - Depression and anxiety JO - Depress Anxiety VL - 30 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: In the first population-based study of psychopathology conducted in Haiti, we documented earthquake-related experiences associated with risk for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) 2-4 months following the 2010 Haiti earthquake. METHODS: A population-based survey was conducted of 1,323 survivors randomly selected from the general nondisplaced community, internally displaced persons camps, and a community clinic. Respondents were from the Nazon area of Port-au-Prince, ∼20 miles from the epicenter. RESULTS: Respondents (90.5%) reported at least one relative/close friend injured/killed, 93% saw dead bodies, and 20.9% lost their job post-earthquake. The prevalence of PTSD (24.6%) and MDD (28.3%) was high. History of violent trauma was associated with risk of PTSD and MDD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.4, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-1.9; AOR, 1.7, 95% CI 1.3, 2.2, respectively). Low social support (AOR, 1.7, 95% CI 1.2, 2.3; AOR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0, 1.9, respectively) increased risk of PTSD and MDD among women. Suffering damage to the home increased risk of MDD in males (AOR 2.8, 95% CI 1.5, 5.5). Associations between being trapped in rubble, major damage to house, job loss, and PTSD; and participation in rescue/recovery, friends/family injured/killed, and MDD varied based on prior history of violent trauma. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing mental health in a post-earthquake setting such as Haiti will require focusing resources on screening and treatment of identified vulnerable groups while targeting improvement of post-earthquake living conditions. Investment in sources of social support for women may make help mitigate the vulnerability of women to PTSD and MDD. SN - 1520-6394 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23124841/Psychopathology_in_the_aftermath_of_the_Haiti_earthquake:_a_population_based_study_of_posttraumatic_stress_disorder_and_major_depression_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/da.22007 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -