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Blinding trust: the effect of perceived group victimhood on intergroup trust.
Pers Soc Psychol Bull 2013; 39(1):115-27PS

Abstract

Four studies investigate how perceptions that one's social group has been victimized in society-that is, perceived group victimhood (PGV)-influence intergroup trust. Jewish and politically conservative participants played an economic trust game ostensibly with "partners" from their ingroup and/or a salient outgroup. Across studies, participants dispositionally or primed to be high in PGV revealed greater trust behavior with ingroup than outgroup partners. Control participants and those dispositionally low in PGV did not display such bias. Study 3 revealed, moreover, that high PGV enhanced ingroup trust even after an overt betrayal by an ingroup partner. Results were not explained by fluctuations in group identification, highlighting the novel, independent role of PGV in shaping an important aspect of intergroup relations-that is, trust. Implications of PGV for intergroup relations are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA. katierotella2013@u.northwestern.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23131906

Citation

Rotella, Katie N., et al. "Blinding Trust: the Effect of Perceived Group Victimhood On Intergroup Trust." Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, vol. 39, no. 1, 2013, pp. 115-27.
Rotella KN, Richeson JA, Chiao JY, et al. Blinding trust: the effect of perceived group victimhood on intergroup trust. Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2013;39(1):115-27.
Rotella, K. N., Richeson, J. A., Chiao, J. Y., & Bean, M. G. (2013). Blinding trust: the effect of perceived group victimhood on intergroup trust. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 39(1), pp. 115-27. doi:10.1177/0146167212466114.
Rotella KN, et al. Blinding Trust: the Effect of Perceived Group Victimhood On Intergroup Trust. Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2013;39(1):115-27. PubMed PMID: 23131906.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Blinding trust: the effect of perceived group victimhood on intergroup trust. AU - Rotella,Katie N, AU - Richeson,Jennifer A, AU - Chiao,Joan Y, AU - Bean,Meghan G, Y1 - 2012/11/06/ PY - 2012/11/8/entrez PY - 2012/11/8/pubmed PY - 2013/4/4/medline SP - 115 EP - 27 JF - Personality & social psychology bulletin JO - Pers Soc Psychol Bull VL - 39 IS - 1 N2 - Four studies investigate how perceptions that one's social group has been victimized in society-that is, perceived group victimhood (PGV)-influence intergroup trust. Jewish and politically conservative participants played an economic trust game ostensibly with "partners" from their ingroup and/or a salient outgroup. Across studies, participants dispositionally or primed to be high in PGV revealed greater trust behavior with ingroup than outgroup partners. Control participants and those dispositionally low in PGV did not display such bias. Study 3 revealed, moreover, that high PGV enhanced ingroup trust even after an overt betrayal by an ingroup partner. Results were not explained by fluctuations in group identification, highlighting the novel, independent role of PGV in shaping an important aspect of intergroup relations-that is, trust. Implications of PGV for intergroup relations are discussed. SN - 1552-7433 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23131906/Blinding_trust:_the_effect_of_perceived_group_victimhood_on_intergroup_trust_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0146167212466114?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -