Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Accelerative and decelerative effects of hedonic valence and emotional arousal during visual scene processing.
Q J Exp Psychol (Hove). 2013; 66(7):1276-301.QJ

Abstract

Perceptual processing of natural scene pictures is enhanced when the scene conveys emotional content. Such "motivated attention" to pleasant and unpleasant pictures has been shown to improve identification accuracy in non-speeded behavioural tasks. An open question is whether emotional content also modulates the speed of visual scene processing. In the present studies we show that unpleasant content reliably slowed two-choice categorization of pictures, irrespective of physical image properties, perceptual complexity, and categorization instructions. Conversely, pleasant content did not slow or even accelerated choice reactions, relative to neutral scenes. As indicated by lateralized readiness potentials, these effects occurred at cognitive processing rather than motor preparation/execution stages. Specifically, analysis of event-related potentials showed a prolongation of early scene discrimination for stimuli perceived as emotionally arousing, regardless of valence, and reflected in delayed peaks of the N1 component. In contrast, the timing of other processing steps, reflected in the P2 and late positive potential components and presumably related to post-discriminatory processes such as stimulus-response mapping, appeared to be determined by hedonic valence, with more pleasant scenes eliciting faster processing. Consistent with this model, varying arousal (low/high) within the emotional categories mediated the effects of valence on choice reaction speed. Functionally, arousal may prolong stimulus analysis in order to prevent erroneous and potentially harmful decisions. Pleasantness may act as a safety signal allowing rapid initiation of overt responses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK. ihssenn@cardiff.ac.ukNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23134534

Citation

Ihssen, Niklas, and Andreas Keil. "Accelerative and Decelerative Effects of Hedonic Valence and Emotional Arousal During Visual Scene Processing." Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (2006), vol. 66, no. 7, 2013, pp. 1276-301.
Ihssen N, Keil A. Accelerative and decelerative effects of hedonic valence and emotional arousal during visual scene processing. Q J Exp Psychol (Hove). 2013;66(7):1276-301.
Ihssen, N., & Keil, A. (2013). Accelerative and decelerative effects of hedonic valence and emotional arousal during visual scene processing. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (2006), 66(7), 1276-301. https://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2012.737003
Ihssen N, Keil A. Accelerative and Decelerative Effects of Hedonic Valence and Emotional Arousal During Visual Scene Processing. Q J Exp Psychol (Hove). 2013;66(7):1276-301. PubMed PMID: 23134534.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Accelerative and decelerative effects of hedonic valence and emotional arousal during visual scene processing. AU - Ihssen,Niklas, AU - Keil,Andreas, Y1 - 2012/11/08/ PY - 2012/11/9/entrez PY - 2012/11/9/pubmed PY - 2013/12/25/medline SP - 1276 EP - 301 JF - Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006) JO - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) VL - 66 IS - 7 N2 - Perceptual processing of natural scene pictures is enhanced when the scene conveys emotional content. Such "motivated attention" to pleasant and unpleasant pictures has been shown to improve identification accuracy in non-speeded behavioural tasks. An open question is whether emotional content also modulates the speed of visual scene processing. In the present studies we show that unpleasant content reliably slowed two-choice categorization of pictures, irrespective of physical image properties, perceptual complexity, and categorization instructions. Conversely, pleasant content did not slow or even accelerated choice reactions, relative to neutral scenes. As indicated by lateralized readiness potentials, these effects occurred at cognitive processing rather than motor preparation/execution stages. Specifically, analysis of event-related potentials showed a prolongation of early scene discrimination for stimuli perceived as emotionally arousing, regardless of valence, and reflected in delayed peaks of the N1 component. In contrast, the timing of other processing steps, reflected in the P2 and late positive potential components and presumably related to post-discriminatory processes such as stimulus-response mapping, appeared to be determined by hedonic valence, with more pleasant scenes eliciting faster processing. Consistent with this model, varying arousal (low/high) within the emotional categories mediated the effects of valence on choice reaction speed. Functionally, arousal may prolong stimulus analysis in order to prevent erroneous and potentially harmful decisions. Pleasantness may act as a safety signal allowing rapid initiation of overt responses. SN - 1747-0226 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23134534/Accelerative_and_decelerative_effects_of_hedonic_valence_and_emotional_arousal_during_visual_scene_processing_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -