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Relationship between community prevalence of obesity and associated behavioral factors and community rates of influenza-related hospitalizations in the United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Findings from studies examining the association between obesity and acute respiratory infection are inconsistent. Few studies have assessed the relationship between obesity-related behavioral factors, such as diet and exercise, and risk of acute respiratory infection.

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether community prevalence of obesity, low fruit/vegetable consumption, and physical inactivity are associated with influenza-related hospitalization rates.

METHODS

Using data from 274 US counties, from 2002 to 2008, we regressed county influenza-related hospitalization rates on county prevalence of obesity (BMI ≥ 30), low fruit/vegetable consumption (<5 servings/day), and physical inactivity (<30 minutes/month recreational exercise), while adjusting for community-level confounders such as insurance coverage and the number of primary care physicians per 100,000 population.

RESULTS

A 5% increase in obesity prevalence was associated with a 12% increase in influenza-related hospitalization rates [adjusted rate ratio (ARR) 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07, 1.17]. Similarly, a 5% increase in the prevalence of low fruit/vegetable consumption and physical inactivity was associated with an increase of 12% (ARR 1.12, 95% CI 1.08, 1.17) and 11% (ARR 1.11, 95% CI 1.07, 1.16), respectively. When all three variables were included in the same model, a 5% increase in prevalence of obesity, low fruit/vegetable consumption, and physical inactivity was associated with 6%, 8%, and 7% increases in influenza-related hospitalization rates, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Communities with a greater prevalence of obesity were more likely to have high influenza-related hospitalization rates. Similarly, less physically active populations, with lower fruit/vegetable consumption, tended to have higher influenza-related hospitalization rates, even after accounting for obesity.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Children's Hospital Informatics Program, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, USA. katia.charland@mcgill.ca

    , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Child
    Child, Preschool
    Female
    Fruit
    Hospitalization
    Humans
    Infant
    Influenza, Human
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Motor Activity
    Obesity
    Residence Characteristics
    United States
    Vegetables
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23136926

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between community prevalence of obesity and associated behavioral factors and community rates of influenza-related hospitalizations in the United States. AU - Charland,Katia M, AU - Buckeridge,David L, AU - Hoen,Anne G, AU - Berry,Jay G, AU - Elixhauser,Anne, AU - Melton,Forrest, AU - Brownstein,John S, Y1 - 2012/11/08/ PY - 2012/11/10/entrez PY - 2012/11/10/pubmed PY - 2014/3/13/medline KW - Diet KW - exercise KW - influenza KW - influenza-like illness KW - obesity SP - 718 EP - 28 JF - Influenza and other respiratory viruses JO - Influenza Other Respir Viruses VL - 7 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Findings from studies examining the association between obesity and acute respiratory infection are inconsistent. Few studies have assessed the relationship between obesity-related behavioral factors, such as diet and exercise, and risk of acute respiratory infection. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether community prevalence of obesity, low fruit/vegetable consumption, and physical inactivity are associated with influenza-related hospitalization rates. METHODS: Using data from 274 US counties, from 2002 to 2008, we regressed county influenza-related hospitalization rates on county prevalence of obesity (BMI ≥ 30), low fruit/vegetable consumption (<5 servings/day), and physical inactivity (<30 minutes/month recreational exercise), while adjusting for community-level confounders such as insurance coverage and the number of primary care physicians per 100,000 population. RESULTS: A 5% increase in obesity prevalence was associated with a 12% increase in influenza-related hospitalization rates [adjusted rate ratio (ARR) 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07, 1.17]. Similarly, a 5% increase in the prevalence of low fruit/vegetable consumption and physical inactivity was associated with an increase of 12% (ARR 1.12, 95% CI 1.08, 1.17) and 11% (ARR 1.11, 95% CI 1.07, 1.16), respectively. When all three variables were included in the same model, a 5% increase in prevalence of obesity, low fruit/vegetable consumption, and physical inactivity was associated with 6%, 8%, and 7% increases in influenza-related hospitalization rates, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Communities with a greater prevalence of obesity were more likely to have high influenza-related hospitalization rates. Similarly, less physically active populations, with lower fruit/vegetable consumption, tended to have higher influenza-related hospitalization rates, even after accounting for obesity. SN - 1750-2659 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23136926/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/irv.12019 ER -