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Prevalence and risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in a Chinese retiree cohort.
BMC Gastroenterol 2012; 12:161BG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Data about prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux diseases (GERD) from Asian populations are still scarce. To provide additional data on prevalence of GERD and investigate its potential risk factors, we performed this cross-sectional study in the Taizhou Retiree Cohort.

METHODS

After physical examination, the participants were asked whether they suffered with heartburn or acid regurgitation in the last 12 months by trained interviewers, and if yes, the severity and frequency of the symptoms were recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations of obesity and other risk factors with GERD were derived from logistic regression models.

RESULTS

8831 retirees completed the questionnaire and physical examination. In total 150 (1.7%) reported the symptoms occurring at least once per week within the last 12 months before the interview. Compared with subjects without GERD, having a history of diabetes mellitus (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.5), hypertension (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-2.1), gastritis (OR 8.2, 95% CI 5.8-11.5), peptic ulcer (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.8-6.1) and high triglyceride level (≥1.81mmol/L) (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.4) were associated with a significantly increased risk of GERD. However, there was no significant association between body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio or waist alone, smoking, consumption of alcohol & tea, and the occurrence of reflux symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS

Compared with Western populations, the prevalence of GERD in this Chinese retiree cohort is low. A history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, gastritis, peptic ulcer or hypertriglyceridaemia increases GERD risk in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, 250012, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23153099

Citation

Chen, Tiantian, et al. "Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms in a Chinese Retiree Cohort." BMC Gastroenterology, vol. 12, 2012, p. 161.
Chen T, Lu M, Wang X, et al. Prevalence and risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in a Chinese retiree cohort. BMC Gastroenterol. 2012;12:161.
Chen, T., Lu, M., Wang, X., Yang, Y., Zhang, J., Jin, L., & Ye, W. (2012). Prevalence and risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in a Chinese retiree cohort. BMC Gastroenterology, 12, p. 161. doi:10.1186/1471-230X-12-161.
Chen T, et al. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms in a Chinese Retiree Cohort. BMC Gastroenterol. 2012 Nov 15;12:161. PubMed PMID: 23153099.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in a Chinese retiree cohort. AU - Chen,Tiantian, AU - Lu,Ming, AU - Wang,Xiaofeng, AU - Yang,Yajun, AU - Zhang,Juan, AU - Jin,Li, AU - Ye,Weimin, Y1 - 2012/11/15/ PY - 2012/06/08/received PY - 2012/11/13/accepted PY - 2012/11/17/entrez PY - 2012/11/17/pubmed PY - 2013/6/15/medline SP - 161 EP - 161 JF - BMC gastroenterology JO - BMC Gastroenterol VL - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Data about prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux diseases (GERD) from Asian populations are still scarce. To provide additional data on prevalence of GERD and investigate its potential risk factors, we performed this cross-sectional study in the Taizhou Retiree Cohort. METHODS: After physical examination, the participants were asked whether they suffered with heartburn or acid regurgitation in the last 12 months by trained interviewers, and if yes, the severity and frequency of the symptoms were recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations of obesity and other risk factors with GERD were derived from logistic regression models. RESULTS: 8831 retirees completed the questionnaire and physical examination. In total 150 (1.7%) reported the symptoms occurring at least once per week within the last 12 months before the interview. Compared with subjects without GERD, having a history of diabetes mellitus (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.5), hypertension (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-2.1), gastritis (OR 8.2, 95% CI 5.8-11.5), peptic ulcer (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.8-6.1) and high triglyceride level (≥1.81mmol/L) (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.4) were associated with a significantly increased risk of GERD. However, there was no significant association between body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio or waist alone, smoking, consumption of alcohol & tea, and the occurrence of reflux symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with Western populations, the prevalence of GERD in this Chinese retiree cohort is low. A history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, gastritis, peptic ulcer or hypertriglyceridaemia increases GERD risk in this population. SN - 1471-230X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23153099/Prevalence_and_risk_factors_of_gastroesophageal_reflux_symptoms_in_a_Chinese_retiree_cohort_ L2 - https://bmcgastroenterol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-230X-12-161 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -