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The influence of lifelong musicianship on neurophysiological measures of concurrent sound segregation.
J Cogn Neurosci. 2013 Apr; 25(4):503-16.JC

Abstract

The ability to separate concurrent sounds based on periodicity cues is critical for parsing complex auditory scenes. This ability is enhanced in young adult musicians and reduced in older adults. Here, we investigated the impact of lifelong musicianship on concurrent sound segregation and perception using scalp-recorded ERPs. Older and younger musicians and nonmusicians were presented with periodic harmonic complexes where the second harmonic could be tuned or mistuned by 1-16% of its original value. The likelihood of perceiving two simultaneous sounds increased with mistuning, and musicians, both older and younger, were more likely to detect and report hearing two sounds when the second harmonic was mistuned at or above 2%. The perception of a mistuned harmonic as a separate sound was paralleled by an object-related negativity that was larger and earlier in younger musicians compared with the other three groups. When listeners made a judgment about the harmonic stimuli, the perception of the mistuned harmonic as a separate sound was paralleled by a positive wave at about 400 msec poststimulus (P400), which was enhanced in both older and younger musicians. These findings suggest attention-dependent processing of a mistuned harmonic is enhanced in older musicians and provides further evidence that age-related decline in hearing abilities are mitigated by musical training.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rotman Research Institute, Toronto, Canada. benjamin.rich.zendel@umontreal.caNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23163409

Citation

Zendel, Benjamin Rich, and Claude Alain. "The Influence of Lifelong Musicianship On Neurophysiological Measures of Concurrent Sound Segregation." Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, vol. 25, no. 4, 2013, pp. 503-16.
Zendel BR, Alain C. The influence of lifelong musicianship on neurophysiological measures of concurrent sound segregation. J Cogn Neurosci. 2013;25(4):503-16.
Zendel, B. R., & Alain, C. (2013). The influence of lifelong musicianship on neurophysiological measures of concurrent sound segregation. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 25(4), 503-16. https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_00329
Zendel BR, Alain C. The Influence of Lifelong Musicianship On Neurophysiological Measures of Concurrent Sound Segregation. J Cogn Neurosci. 2013;25(4):503-16. PubMed PMID: 23163409.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of lifelong musicianship on neurophysiological measures of concurrent sound segregation. AU - Zendel,Benjamin Rich, AU - Alain,Claude, Y1 - 2012/11/19/ PY - 2012/11/21/entrez PY - 2012/11/21/pubmed PY - 2013/9/5/medline SP - 503 EP - 16 JF - Journal of cognitive neuroscience JO - J Cogn Neurosci VL - 25 IS - 4 N2 - The ability to separate concurrent sounds based on periodicity cues is critical for parsing complex auditory scenes. This ability is enhanced in young adult musicians and reduced in older adults. Here, we investigated the impact of lifelong musicianship on concurrent sound segregation and perception using scalp-recorded ERPs. Older and younger musicians and nonmusicians were presented with periodic harmonic complexes where the second harmonic could be tuned or mistuned by 1-16% of its original value. The likelihood of perceiving two simultaneous sounds increased with mistuning, and musicians, both older and younger, were more likely to detect and report hearing two sounds when the second harmonic was mistuned at or above 2%. The perception of a mistuned harmonic as a separate sound was paralleled by an object-related negativity that was larger and earlier in younger musicians compared with the other three groups. When listeners made a judgment about the harmonic stimuli, the perception of the mistuned harmonic as a separate sound was paralleled by a positive wave at about 400 msec poststimulus (P400), which was enhanced in both older and younger musicians. These findings suggest attention-dependent processing of a mistuned harmonic is enhanced in older musicians and provides further evidence that age-related decline in hearing abilities are mitigated by musical training. SN - 1530-8898 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23163409/The_influence_of_lifelong_musicianship_on_neurophysiological_measures_of_concurrent_sound_segregation_ L2 - https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/10.1162/jocn_a_00329?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -