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Red and processed meat consumption and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.
Eur J Clin Nutr 2013; 67(1):91-5EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES

Epidemiological evidence is suggestive, but inconclusive, for an association between consumption of red and processed meat and risk of stroke. We aimed to assess this association by conducting a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

SUBJECTS/METHODS

We performed a literature search on PubMed database through June 2012 to identify prospective cohort studies of red and processed meat intake in relation to risk of stroke. Reference lists of the retrieved articles were also reviewed. Both fixed-effects and random-effects model were assumed to compute the summary risk estimates.

RESULTS

Five large independent prospective cohort studies were identified. These studies contained a total of 2 39 251 subjects and 9593 stroke events. Comparing the highest category of consumption with lowest category, the pooled relative risks (RRs) of total stroke were 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05-1.25) for total meat (red and processed meat combined) (n=4), 1.09 (95% CI, 1.01-1.18) for red meat (n=5) and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.05-1.25) for processed meat (n=5); the corresponding RRs of ischemic stroke (highest vs lowest quintile) were 1.15 (95% CI, 1.04-1.28), 1.13(95% CI, 1.01-1.25) and 1.19 (95% CI, 1.08-1.31). Consumption of red and/or processed meat was not associated with hemorrhagic stroke. In the dose-response analysis, the risk of stroke increased significantly by 10% and 13% for each 100 g per day increment in total and red meat consumption, respectively, and by 11% for each 50 g per day increment in processed meat consumption.

CONCLUSION

Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that consumption of red and/or processed meat increase risk of stroke, in particular, ischemic stroke.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23169473

Citation

Chen, G-C, et al. "Red and Processed Meat Consumption and Risk of Stroke: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 67, no. 1, 2013, pp. 91-5.
Chen GC, Lv DB, Pang Z, et al. Red and processed meat consumption and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2013;67(1):91-5.
Chen, G. C., Lv, D. B., Pang, Z., & Liu, Q. F. (2013). Red and processed meat consumption and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 67(1), pp. 91-5. doi:10.1038/ejcn.2012.180.
Chen GC, et al. Red and Processed Meat Consumption and Risk of Stroke: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2013;67(1):91-5. PubMed PMID: 23169473.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Red and processed meat consumption and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. AU - Chen,G-C, AU - Lv,D-B, AU - Pang,Z, AU - Liu,Q-F, Y1 - 2012/11/21/ PY - 2012/11/22/entrez PY - 2012/11/22/pubmed PY - 2013/6/26/medline SP - 91 EP - 5 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 67 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Epidemiological evidence is suggestive, but inconclusive, for an association between consumption of red and processed meat and risk of stroke. We aimed to assess this association by conducting a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. SUBJECTS/METHODS: We performed a literature search on PubMed database through June 2012 to identify prospective cohort studies of red and processed meat intake in relation to risk of stroke. Reference lists of the retrieved articles were also reviewed. Both fixed-effects and random-effects model were assumed to compute the summary risk estimates. RESULTS: Five large independent prospective cohort studies were identified. These studies contained a total of 2 39 251 subjects and 9593 stroke events. Comparing the highest category of consumption with lowest category, the pooled relative risks (RRs) of total stroke were 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05-1.25) for total meat (red and processed meat combined) (n=4), 1.09 (95% CI, 1.01-1.18) for red meat (n=5) and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.05-1.25) for processed meat (n=5); the corresponding RRs of ischemic stroke (highest vs lowest quintile) were 1.15 (95% CI, 1.04-1.28), 1.13(95% CI, 1.01-1.25) and 1.19 (95% CI, 1.08-1.31). Consumption of red and/or processed meat was not associated with hemorrhagic stroke. In the dose-response analysis, the risk of stroke increased significantly by 10% and 13% for each 100 g per day increment in total and red meat consumption, respectively, and by 11% for each 50 g per day increment in processed meat consumption. CONCLUSION: Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that consumption of red and/or processed meat increase risk of stroke, in particular, ischemic stroke. SN - 1476-5640 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23169473/Red_and_processed_meat_consumption_and_risk_of_stroke:_a_meta_analysis_of_prospective_cohort_studies_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2012.180 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -