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Anatomy and physiology of the clitoris, vestibular bulbs, and labia minora with a review of the female orgasm and the prevention of female sexual dysfunction.
Clin Anat. 2013 Jan; 26(1):134-52.CA

Abstract

This review, with 21 figures and 1 video, aims to clarify some important aspects of the anatomy and physiology of the female erectile organs (triggers of orgasm), which are important for the prevention of female sexual dysfunction. The clitoris is the homologue of the male's glans and corpora cavernosa, and erection is reached in three phases: latent, turgid, and rigid. The vestibular bulbs cause "vaginal" orgasmic contractions, through the rhythmic contraction of the bulbocavernosus muscles. Because of the engorgement with blood during sexual arousal, the labia minora become turgid, doubling or tripling in thickness. The corpus spongiosum of the female urethra becomes congested during sexual arousal; therefore, male erection equals erection of the female erectile organs. The correct anatomical term to describe the erectile tissues responsible for female orgasm is the female penis. Vaginal orgasm and the G-spot do not exist. These claims are found in numerous articles that have been written by Addiego F, Whipple B, Jannini E, Buisson O, O'Connell H, Brody S, Ostrzenski A, and others, have no scientific basis. Orgasm is an intense sensation of pleasure achieved by stimulation of erogenous zones. Women do not have a refractory period after each orgasm and can, therefore, experience multiple orgasms. Clitoral sexual response and the female orgasm are not affected by aging. Sexologists should define having sex/love making when orgasm occurs for both partners with or without vaginal intercourse.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centro Italiano di Sessuologia, Via Regnoli 74, Bologna, Italy. dottvincenzopuppo@yahoo.it

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23169570

Citation

Puppo, Vincenzo. "Anatomy and Physiology of the Clitoris, Vestibular Bulbs, and Labia Minora With a Review of the Female Orgasm and the Prevention of Female Sexual Dysfunction." Clinical Anatomy (New York, N.Y.), vol. 26, no. 1, 2013, pp. 134-52.
Puppo V. Anatomy and physiology of the clitoris, vestibular bulbs, and labia minora with a review of the female orgasm and the prevention of female sexual dysfunction. Clin Anat. 2013;26(1):134-52.
Puppo, V. (2013). Anatomy and physiology of the clitoris, vestibular bulbs, and labia minora with a review of the female orgasm and the prevention of female sexual dysfunction. Clinical Anatomy (New York, N.Y.), 26(1), 134-52. https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.22177
Puppo V. Anatomy and Physiology of the Clitoris, Vestibular Bulbs, and Labia Minora With a Review of the Female Orgasm and the Prevention of Female Sexual Dysfunction. Clin Anat. 2013;26(1):134-52. PubMed PMID: 23169570.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anatomy and physiology of the clitoris, vestibular bulbs, and labia minora with a review of the female orgasm and the prevention of female sexual dysfunction. A1 - Puppo,Vincenzo, Y1 - 2012/11/21/ PY - 2012/07/21/received PY - 2012/09/10/accepted PY - 2012/11/22/entrez PY - 2012/11/22/pubmed PY - 2013/6/6/medline SP - 134 EP - 52 JF - Clinical anatomy (New York, N.Y.) JO - Clin Anat VL - 26 IS - 1 N2 - This review, with 21 figures and 1 video, aims to clarify some important aspects of the anatomy and physiology of the female erectile organs (triggers of orgasm), which are important for the prevention of female sexual dysfunction. The clitoris is the homologue of the male's glans and corpora cavernosa, and erection is reached in three phases: latent, turgid, and rigid. The vestibular bulbs cause "vaginal" orgasmic contractions, through the rhythmic contraction of the bulbocavernosus muscles. Because of the engorgement with blood during sexual arousal, the labia minora become turgid, doubling or tripling in thickness. The corpus spongiosum of the female urethra becomes congested during sexual arousal; therefore, male erection equals erection of the female erectile organs. The correct anatomical term to describe the erectile tissues responsible for female orgasm is the female penis. Vaginal orgasm and the G-spot do not exist. These claims are found in numerous articles that have been written by Addiego F, Whipple B, Jannini E, Buisson O, O'Connell H, Brody S, Ostrzenski A, and others, have no scientific basis. Orgasm is an intense sensation of pleasure achieved by stimulation of erogenous zones. Women do not have a refractory period after each orgasm and can, therefore, experience multiple orgasms. Clitoral sexual response and the female orgasm are not affected by aging. Sexologists should define having sex/love making when orgasm occurs for both partners with or without vaginal intercourse. SN - 1098-2353 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23169570/Anatomy_and_physiology_of_the_clitoris_vestibular_bulbs_and_labia_minora_with_a_review_of_the_female_orgasm_and_the_prevention_of_female_sexual_dysfunction_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.22177 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -