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Association between dairy food consumption and risk of myocardial infarction in women differs by type of dairy food.
J Nutr 2013; 143(1):74-9JN

Abstract

The relation between dairy foods, particularly specific foods, and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains unclear. We examined the association between total, as well as specific, dairy food intakes and incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) in a prospective population-based cohort. We followed 33,636 women (aged 48-83 y), free from CVD, cancer, and diabetes at baseline (1997), in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Consumption of milk, cultured milk/yogurt, cheese, cream, crème fraiche, and butter was obtained from a validated self-administered FFQ at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate HRs and 95% CIs, adjusted for relevant CVD risk factors. MI incidence was ascertained from national registries. Over 11.6 y of follow-up, we ascertained 1392 cases of MI. When the highest quintile was compared with the lowest quintile, total dairy food intake was inversely associated with MI risk [multivariable adjusted HR: 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.95)]. Among specific dairy food products, total cheese was inversely associated [HR: 0.74 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.91)] and butter used on bread but not on cooking was positively associated [HR: 1.34 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.75)] with MI risk. Other specific dairy food products were not significantly associated with MI risk. No differences were observed between consumption of specific low-fat and high-fat dairy foods, expressed as either absolute intakes or intakes relative to the total, and MI risk. Failure to consider dairy foods as a heterogeneous group in future studies could hamper important insights of relevance for the development of dietary guidelines.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. emma.patterson@ki.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23173172

Citation

Patterson, Emma, et al. "Association Between Dairy Food Consumption and Risk of Myocardial Infarction in Women Differs By Type of Dairy Food." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 143, no. 1, 2013, pp. 74-9.
Patterson E, Larsson SC, Wolk A, et al. Association between dairy food consumption and risk of myocardial infarction in women differs by type of dairy food. J Nutr. 2013;143(1):74-9.
Patterson, E., Larsson, S. C., Wolk, A., & Åkesson, A. (2013). Association between dairy food consumption and risk of myocardial infarction in women differs by type of dairy food. The Journal of Nutrition, 143(1), pp. 74-9. doi:10.3945/jn.112.166330.
Patterson E, et al. Association Between Dairy Food Consumption and Risk of Myocardial Infarction in Women Differs By Type of Dairy Food. J Nutr. 2013;143(1):74-9. PubMed PMID: 23173172.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between dairy food consumption and risk of myocardial infarction in women differs by type of dairy food. AU - Patterson,Emma, AU - Larsson,Susanna C, AU - Wolk,Alicja, AU - Åkesson,Agneta, Y1 - 2012/11/21/ PY - 2012/11/23/entrez PY - 2012/11/23/pubmed PY - 2013/2/26/medline SP - 74 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 143 IS - 1 N2 - The relation between dairy foods, particularly specific foods, and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains unclear. We examined the association between total, as well as specific, dairy food intakes and incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) in a prospective population-based cohort. We followed 33,636 women (aged 48-83 y), free from CVD, cancer, and diabetes at baseline (1997), in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Consumption of milk, cultured milk/yogurt, cheese, cream, crème fraiche, and butter was obtained from a validated self-administered FFQ at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate HRs and 95% CIs, adjusted for relevant CVD risk factors. MI incidence was ascertained from national registries. Over 11.6 y of follow-up, we ascertained 1392 cases of MI. When the highest quintile was compared with the lowest quintile, total dairy food intake was inversely associated with MI risk [multivariable adjusted HR: 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.95)]. Among specific dairy food products, total cheese was inversely associated [HR: 0.74 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.91)] and butter used on bread but not on cooking was positively associated [HR: 1.34 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.75)] with MI risk. Other specific dairy food products were not significantly associated with MI risk. No differences were observed between consumption of specific low-fat and high-fat dairy foods, expressed as either absolute intakes or intakes relative to the total, and MI risk. Failure to consider dairy foods as a heterogeneous group in future studies could hamper important insights of relevance for the development of dietary guidelines. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23173172/Association_between_dairy_food_consumption_and_risk_of_myocardial_infarction_in_women_differs_by_type_of_dairy_food_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.112.166330 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -