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Consumption of breakfast and the type of breakfast consumed are positively associated with nutrient intakes and adequacy of Canadian adults.
J Nutr. 2013 Jan; 143(1):86-92.JN

Abstract

Few studies have assessed the associations between breakfast intake and nutrient adequacy [where inadequacy reflects prevalence of usual intakes below the estimated average requirement (EAR) and potential excess reflects the prevalence above the tolerable upper intake level (UL)]. This study examined associations among breakfast, nutrient intakes, and nutrient adequacy in Canadian adults. Respondents aged ≥19 y in the Canadian Community Health Survey 2.2 (n = 19,913) were classified as breakfast nonconsumers (11%), ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) breakfast consumers (20%), or other breakfast consumers (69%). Nutrient intakes from food (24-h recall) and the prevalence of usual intakes below the EAR and above the UL from food alone and from food plus supplements were compared by breakfast group. Usual intake distributions were estimated using the National Cancer Institute method. Breakfast consumers, and to a greater extent RTEC breakfast consumers, had significantly higher intakes of fiber and several vitamins and minerals than breakfast nonconsumers. Compared with nonconsumers, RTEC and other breakfast consumers had significantly lower prevalences below the EARs for vitamin A and magnesium. The prevalences below the EARs of these nutrients and calcium, thiamin, vitamin D, and iron were significantly lower with RTEC breakfasts than with other breakfasts. Similar patterns were observed from food alone compared with food plus supplements. Breakfast consumption did not affect prevalence above the UL based on food sources, although based on food plus supplements, breakfast consumers had slightly higher proportions that were above the UL than nonconsumers for several nutrients. Breakfast, especially an RTEC breakfast, is associated with improved nutrient adequacy and does not meaningfully affect prevalence above the UL.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Food, Nutrition and Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. susan.barr@ubc.ca.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23173176

Citation

Barr, Susan I., et al. "Consumption of Breakfast and the Type of Breakfast Consumed Are Positively Associated With Nutrient Intakes and Adequacy of Canadian Adults." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 143, no. 1, 2013, pp. 86-92.
Barr SI, DiFrancesco L, Fulgoni VL. Consumption of breakfast and the type of breakfast consumed are positively associated with nutrient intakes and adequacy of Canadian adults. J Nutr. 2013;143(1):86-92.
Barr, S. I., DiFrancesco, L., & Fulgoni, V. L. (2013). Consumption of breakfast and the type of breakfast consumed are positively associated with nutrient intakes and adequacy of Canadian adults. The Journal of Nutrition, 143(1), 86-92. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.112.167098
Barr SI, DiFrancesco L, Fulgoni VL. Consumption of Breakfast and the Type of Breakfast Consumed Are Positively Associated With Nutrient Intakes and Adequacy of Canadian Adults. J Nutr. 2013;143(1):86-92. PubMed PMID: 23173176.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of breakfast and the type of breakfast consumed are positively associated with nutrient intakes and adequacy of Canadian adults. AU - Barr,Susan I, AU - DiFrancesco,Loretta, AU - Fulgoni,Victor L,3rd Y1 - 2012/11/21/ PY - 2012/11/23/entrez PY - 2012/11/23/pubmed PY - 2013/2/26/medline SP - 86 EP - 92 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 143 IS - 1 N2 - Few studies have assessed the associations between breakfast intake and nutrient adequacy [where inadequacy reflects prevalence of usual intakes below the estimated average requirement (EAR) and potential excess reflects the prevalence above the tolerable upper intake level (UL)]. This study examined associations among breakfast, nutrient intakes, and nutrient adequacy in Canadian adults. Respondents aged ≥19 y in the Canadian Community Health Survey 2.2 (n = 19,913) were classified as breakfast nonconsumers (11%), ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) breakfast consumers (20%), or other breakfast consumers (69%). Nutrient intakes from food (24-h recall) and the prevalence of usual intakes below the EAR and above the UL from food alone and from food plus supplements were compared by breakfast group. Usual intake distributions were estimated using the National Cancer Institute method. Breakfast consumers, and to a greater extent RTEC breakfast consumers, had significantly higher intakes of fiber and several vitamins and minerals than breakfast nonconsumers. Compared with nonconsumers, RTEC and other breakfast consumers had significantly lower prevalences below the EARs for vitamin A and magnesium. The prevalences below the EARs of these nutrients and calcium, thiamin, vitamin D, and iron were significantly lower with RTEC breakfasts than with other breakfasts. Similar patterns were observed from food alone compared with food plus supplements. Breakfast consumption did not affect prevalence above the UL based on food sources, although based on food plus supplements, breakfast consumers had slightly higher proportions that were above the UL than nonconsumers for several nutrients. Breakfast, especially an RTEC breakfast, is associated with improved nutrient adequacy and does not meaningfully affect prevalence above the UL. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23173176/Consumption_of_breakfast_and_the_type_of_breakfast_consumed_are_positively_associated_with_nutrient_intakes_and_adequacy_of_Canadian_adults_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.112.167098 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -