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Dairy food consumption and meal-induced cortisol response interacted to influence weight loss in overweight women undergoing a 12-week, meal-controlled, weight loss intervention.

Abstract

Dairy food enhances weight loss in animal models, possibly by modifying the metabolic effects of cortisol. This study determined in overweight women (ages 20.0-45.9 y; n = 51) whether including dairy food in an energy-restricted diet affects cortisol concentrations and whether differences in provoked cortisol explain the magnitude of weight loss. Women received either an adequate amount of dairy food (AD), the equivalent of ≥711 mL/d milk, or a low amount of dairy food (LD), the equivalent to ≤238 mL/d milk, in a 12-wk, energy-restricted dietary intervention. Participants were tested in a 12-h laboratory visit, which included 2 standard meals and a dinner buffet that was consumed ad libitum. Salivary cortisol was measured from waking to bedtime. Energy restriction increased (P ≤ 0.04) the minimum and decreased (P ≤ 0.02) the diurnal amplitude in the salivary cortisol concentration from baseline to postintervention. Energy restriction enhanced the dinner meal-stimulated salivary cortisol response (DMR) (P ≤ 0.02) but only in the LD group. Compared with the LD treatment, the AD treatment induced (P ≤ 0.04) greater reductions in body weight and fat, but only in women characterized as having a baseline DMR (responders) (n = 26); weight and fat lost in the AD and LD groups were similar in nonresponders (n = 25). Overall, energy restriction dampened diurnal salivary cortisol fluctuations [symptomatic of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction] and enhanced dinner meal-stimulated salivary cortisol concentrations. The AD treatment prevented the latter. Furthermore, certain phenotypic markers of HPA axis function may help to expose the weight-reducing effects of consuming dairy food.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA, USA.

    , , ,

    Source

    The Journal of nutrition 143:1 2013 Jan pg 46-52

    MeSH

    Adiposity
    Adult
    Biomarkers
    Body Mass Index
    California
    Circadian Rhythm
    Dairy Products
    Diet, Reducing
    Female
    Humans
    Hydrocortisone
    Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System
    Meals
    Middle Aged
    Obesity
    Overweight
    Pituitary-Adrenal System
    Saliva
    Weight Loss
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23190756

    Citation

    Witbracht, Megan G., et al. "Dairy Food Consumption and Meal-induced Cortisol Response Interacted to Influence Weight Loss in Overweight Women Undergoing a 12-week, Meal-controlled, Weight Loss Intervention." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 143, no. 1, 2013, pp. 46-52.
    Witbracht MG, Van Loan M, Adams SH, et al. Dairy food consumption and meal-induced cortisol response interacted to influence weight loss in overweight women undergoing a 12-week, meal-controlled, weight loss intervention. J Nutr. 2013;143(1):46-52.
    Witbracht, M. G., Van Loan, M., Adams, S. H., Keim, N. L., & Laugero, K. D. (2013). Dairy food consumption and meal-induced cortisol response interacted to influence weight loss in overweight women undergoing a 12-week, meal-controlled, weight loss intervention. The Journal of Nutrition, 143(1), pp. 46-52. doi:10.3945/jn.112.166355.
    Witbracht MG, et al. Dairy Food Consumption and Meal-induced Cortisol Response Interacted to Influence Weight Loss in Overweight Women Undergoing a 12-week, Meal-controlled, Weight Loss Intervention. J Nutr. 2013;143(1):46-52. PubMed PMID: 23190756.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dairy food consumption and meal-induced cortisol response interacted to influence weight loss in overweight women undergoing a 12-week, meal-controlled, weight loss intervention. AU - Witbracht,Megan G, AU - Van Loan,Marta, AU - Adams,Sean H, AU - Keim,Nancy L, AU - Laugero,Kevin D, Y1 - 2012/11/28/ PY - 2012/11/30/entrez PY - 2012/11/30/pubmed PY - 2013/2/26/medline SP - 46 EP - 52 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 143 IS - 1 N2 - Dairy food enhances weight loss in animal models, possibly by modifying the metabolic effects of cortisol. This study determined in overweight women (ages 20.0-45.9 y; n = 51) whether including dairy food in an energy-restricted diet affects cortisol concentrations and whether differences in provoked cortisol explain the magnitude of weight loss. Women received either an adequate amount of dairy food (AD), the equivalent of ≥711 mL/d milk, or a low amount of dairy food (LD), the equivalent to ≤238 mL/d milk, in a 12-wk, energy-restricted dietary intervention. Participants were tested in a 12-h laboratory visit, which included 2 standard meals and a dinner buffet that was consumed ad libitum. Salivary cortisol was measured from waking to bedtime. Energy restriction increased (P ≤ 0.04) the minimum and decreased (P ≤ 0.02) the diurnal amplitude in the salivary cortisol concentration from baseline to postintervention. Energy restriction enhanced the dinner meal-stimulated salivary cortisol response (DMR) (P ≤ 0.02) but only in the LD group. Compared with the LD treatment, the AD treatment induced (P ≤ 0.04) greater reductions in body weight and fat, but only in women characterized as having a baseline DMR (responders) (n = 26); weight and fat lost in the AD and LD groups were similar in nonresponders (n = 25). Overall, energy restriction dampened diurnal salivary cortisol fluctuations [symptomatic of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction] and enhanced dinner meal-stimulated salivary cortisol concentrations. The AD treatment prevented the latter. Furthermore, certain phenotypic markers of HPA axis function may help to expose the weight-reducing effects of consuming dairy food. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23190756/Dairy_food_consumption_and_meal_induced_cortisol_response_interacted_to_influence_weight_loss_in_overweight_women_undergoing_a_12_week_meal_controlled_weight_loss_intervention_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.112.166355 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -