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Cannabinoids facilitate the swallowing reflex elicited by the superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in rats.
PLoS One 2012; 7(11):e50703Plos

Abstract

Cannabinoids have been reported to be involved in affecting various biological functions through binding with cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2). The present study was designed to investigate whether swallowing, an essential component of feeding behavior, is modulated after the administration of cannabinoid. The swallowing reflex evoked by the repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve in rats was recorded before and after the administration of the cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55-212-2 (WIN), with or without CB1 or CB2 antagonist. The onset latency of the first swallow and the time intervals between swallows were analyzed. The onset latency and the intervals between swallows were shorter after the intravenous administration of WIN, and the strength of effect of WIN was dose-dependent. Although the intravenous administration of CB1 antagonist prior to intravenous administration of WIN blocked the effect of WIN, the administration of CB2 antagonist did not block the effect of WIN. The microinjection of the CB1 receptor antagonist directly into the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) prior to intravenous administration of WIN also blocked the effect of WIN. Immunofluorescence histochemistry was conducted to assess the co-localization of CB1 receptor immunoreactivity to glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) or glutamate in the NTS. CB1 receptor was co-localized more with GAD67 than glutamate in the NTS. These findings suggest that cannabinoids facilitate the swallowing reflex via CB1 receptors. Cannabinoids may attenuate the tonic inhibitory effect of GABA (gamma-aminobuteric acid) neurons in the central pattern generator for swallowing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Oral Physiology, Department of Oral Biological Science, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23209814

Citation

Mostafeezur, Rahman Md, et al. "Cannabinoids Facilitate the Swallowing Reflex Elicited By the Superior Laryngeal Nerve Stimulation in Rats." PloS One, vol. 7, no. 11, 2012, pp. e50703.
Mostafeezur RM, Zakir HM, Takatsuji H, et al. Cannabinoids facilitate the swallowing reflex elicited by the superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in rats. PLoS ONE. 2012;7(11):e50703.
Mostafeezur, R. M., Zakir, H. M., Takatsuji, H., Yamada, Y., Yamamura, K., & Kitagawa, J. (2012). Cannabinoids facilitate the swallowing reflex elicited by the superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in rats. PloS One, 7(11), pp. e50703. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0050703.
Mostafeezur RM, et al. Cannabinoids Facilitate the Swallowing Reflex Elicited By the Superior Laryngeal Nerve Stimulation in Rats. PLoS ONE. 2012;7(11):e50703. PubMed PMID: 23209814.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cannabinoids facilitate the swallowing reflex elicited by the superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in rats. AU - Mostafeezur,Rahman Md, AU - Zakir,Hossain Md, AU - Takatsuji,Hanako, AU - Yamada,Yoshiaki, AU - Yamamura,Kensuke, AU - Kitagawa,Junichi, Y1 - 2012/11/27/ PY - 2012/05/16/received PY - 2012/10/25/accepted PY - 2012/12/5/entrez PY - 2012/12/5/pubmed PY - 2013/5/23/medline SP - e50703 EP - e50703 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 7 IS - 11 N2 - Cannabinoids have been reported to be involved in affecting various biological functions through binding with cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2). The present study was designed to investigate whether swallowing, an essential component of feeding behavior, is modulated after the administration of cannabinoid. The swallowing reflex evoked by the repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve in rats was recorded before and after the administration of the cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55-212-2 (WIN), with or without CB1 or CB2 antagonist. The onset latency of the first swallow and the time intervals between swallows were analyzed. The onset latency and the intervals between swallows were shorter after the intravenous administration of WIN, and the strength of effect of WIN was dose-dependent. Although the intravenous administration of CB1 antagonist prior to intravenous administration of WIN blocked the effect of WIN, the administration of CB2 antagonist did not block the effect of WIN. The microinjection of the CB1 receptor antagonist directly into the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) prior to intravenous administration of WIN also blocked the effect of WIN. Immunofluorescence histochemistry was conducted to assess the co-localization of CB1 receptor immunoreactivity to glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) or glutamate in the NTS. CB1 receptor was co-localized more with GAD67 than glutamate in the NTS. These findings suggest that cannabinoids facilitate the swallowing reflex via CB1 receptors. Cannabinoids may attenuate the tonic inhibitory effect of GABA (gamma-aminobuteric acid) neurons in the central pattern generator for swallowing. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23209814/Cannabinoids_facilitate_the_swallowing_reflex_elicited_by_the_superior_laryngeal_nerve_stimulation_in_rats_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0050703 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -