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Role of body mass index and gestational weight gain in breastfeeding outcomes.
Breastfeed Med 2012; 7(6):448-56BM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study determined whether high maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and/or excess gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with reduced breastfeeding duration and earlier formula supplementation.

STUDY DESIGN

A prospective longitudinal cohort of postpartum women (n=718), who were a subset of a larger randomized trial, was followed for 6 months postdelivery. We evaluated the relationship between BMI or BMI/GWG groups and timing of breastfeeding cessation and introduction of formula using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Then, we used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the relationship between BMI and BMI/GWG on these breastfeeding outcomes after controlling for potential confounding variables.

RESULTS

The expected relationships between high BMI and high BMI/GWG and poor breastfeeding outcomes were observed in Kaplan-Meier curves. However, after adjusting for relevant maternal and infant covariates in the Cox models, the differences became nonsignificant. Prepregnancy BMI category was not statistically associated with breastfeeding duration (p=0.06) or timing of formula introduction (p=0.15). Similarly, BMI and GWG in combination were not associated with duration (p=0.33) or timing of formula introduction (p=0.18). Mothers' intended breastfeeding duration and rating of the importance of breastfeeding remained the only significant modifiable predictors of breastfeeding outcomes in the final models.

CONCLUSIONS

Maternal BMI and GWG were not significantly associated with breastfeeding outcomes after adjusting for confounding variables. Mothers' plans for breastfeeding duration and the importance mothers assign to breastfeeding remain the optimal intervention points for lengthening breastfeeding duration and reducing formula supplementation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA. cjb25@psu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23215909

Citation

Bartok, Cynthia J., et al. "Role of Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain in Breastfeeding Outcomes." Breastfeeding Medicine : the Official Journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, vol. 7, no. 6, 2012, pp. 448-56.
Bartok CJ, Schaefer EW, Beiler JS, et al. Role of body mass index and gestational weight gain in breastfeeding outcomes. Breastfeed Med. 2012;7(6):448-56.
Bartok, C. J., Schaefer, E. W., Beiler, J. S., & Paul, I. M. (2012). Role of body mass index and gestational weight gain in breastfeeding outcomes. Breastfeeding Medicine : the Official Journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, 7(6), pp. 448-56. doi:10.1089/bfm.2011.0127.
Bartok CJ, et al. Role of Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain in Breastfeeding Outcomes. Breastfeed Med. 2012;7(6):448-56. PubMed PMID: 23215909.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of body mass index and gestational weight gain in breastfeeding outcomes. AU - Bartok,Cynthia J, AU - Schaefer,Eric W, AU - Beiler,Jessica S, AU - Paul,Ian M, Y1 - 2012/06/25/ PY - 2012/12/11/entrez PY - 2012/12/12/pubmed PY - 2013/5/17/medline SP - 448 EP - 56 JF - Breastfeeding medicine : the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine JO - Breastfeed Med VL - 7 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study determined whether high maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and/or excess gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with reduced breastfeeding duration and earlier formula supplementation. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective longitudinal cohort of postpartum women (n=718), who were a subset of a larger randomized trial, was followed for 6 months postdelivery. We evaluated the relationship between BMI or BMI/GWG groups and timing of breastfeeding cessation and introduction of formula using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Then, we used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the relationship between BMI and BMI/GWG on these breastfeeding outcomes after controlling for potential confounding variables. RESULTS: The expected relationships between high BMI and high BMI/GWG and poor breastfeeding outcomes were observed in Kaplan-Meier curves. However, after adjusting for relevant maternal and infant covariates in the Cox models, the differences became nonsignificant. Prepregnancy BMI category was not statistically associated with breastfeeding duration (p=0.06) or timing of formula introduction (p=0.15). Similarly, BMI and GWG in combination were not associated with duration (p=0.33) or timing of formula introduction (p=0.18). Mothers' intended breastfeeding duration and rating of the importance of breastfeeding remained the only significant modifiable predictors of breastfeeding outcomes in the final models. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal BMI and GWG were not significantly associated with breastfeeding outcomes after adjusting for confounding variables. Mothers' plans for breastfeeding duration and the importance mothers assign to breastfeeding remain the optimal intervention points for lengthening breastfeeding duration and reducing formula supplementation. SN - 1556-8342 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23215909/Role_of_body_mass_index_and_gestational_weight_gain_in_breastfeeding_outcomes_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/bfm.2011.0127?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -