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Circulating carotenoids and risk of breast cancer: pooled analysis of eight prospective studies.
J Natl Cancer Inst 2012; 104(24):1905-16JNCI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Carotenoids, micronutrients in fruits and vegetables, may reduce breast cancer risk. Most, but not all, past studies of circulating carotenoids and breast cancer have found an inverse association with at least one carotenoid, although the specific carotenoid has varied across studies.

METHODS

We conducted a pooled analysis of eight cohort studies comprising more than 80% of the world's published prospective data on plasma or serum carotenoids and breast cancer, including 3055 case subjects and 3956 matched control subjects. To account for laboratory differences and examine population differences across studies, we recalibrated participant carotenoid levels to a common standard by reassaying 20 plasma or serum samples from each cohort together at the same laboratory. Using conditional logistic regression, adjusting for several breast cancer risk factors, we calculated relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using quintiles defined among the control subjects from all studies. All P values are two-sided.

RESULTS

Statistically significant inverse associations with breast cancer were observed for α-carotene (top vs bottom quintile RR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.71 to 1.05, P(trend) = .04), β-carotene (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.70 to 0.98, P(trend) = .02), lutein+zeaxanthin (RR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.70 to 1.01, P(trend) = .05), lycopene (RR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62 to 0.99, P(trend) = .02), and total carotenoids (RR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.68 to 0.96, P(trend) = .01). β-Cryptoxanthin was not statistically significantly associated with risk. Tests for heterogeneity across studies were not statistically significant. For several carotenoids, associations appeared stronger for estrogen receptor negative (ER(-)) than for ER(+) tumors (eg, β-carotene: ER(-): top vs bottom quintile RR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.36 to 0.77, P(trend) = .001; ER(+): RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.66 to 1.04, P(trend) = .06; P(heterogeneity) = .01).

CONCLUSIONS

This comprehensive prospective analysis suggests women with higher circulating levels of α-carotene, β-carotene, lutein+zeaxanthin, lycopene, and total carotenoids may be at reduced risk of breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA. heather.eliassen@channing.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23221879

Citation

Eliassen, A Heather, et al. "Circulating Carotenoids and Risk of Breast Cancer: Pooled Analysis of Eight Prospective Studies." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 104, no. 24, 2012, pp. 1905-16.
Eliassen AH, Hendrickson SJ, Brinton LA, et al. Circulating carotenoids and risk of breast cancer: pooled analysis of eight prospective studies. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2012;104(24):1905-16.
Eliassen, A. H., Hendrickson, S. J., Brinton, L. A., Buring, J. E., Campos, H., Dai, Q., ... Hankinson, S. E. (2012). Circulating carotenoids and risk of breast cancer: pooled analysis of eight prospective studies. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 104(24), pp. 1905-16. doi:10.1093/jnci/djs461.
Eliassen AH, et al. Circulating Carotenoids and Risk of Breast Cancer: Pooled Analysis of Eight Prospective Studies. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2012 Dec 19;104(24):1905-16. PubMed PMID: 23221879.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Circulating carotenoids and risk of breast cancer: pooled analysis of eight prospective studies. AU - Eliassen,A Heather, AU - Hendrickson,Sara J, AU - Brinton,Louise A, AU - Buring,Julie E, AU - Campos,Hannia, AU - Dai,Qi, AU - Dorgan,Joanne F, AU - Franke,Adrian A, AU - Gao,Yu-tang, AU - Goodman,Marc T, AU - Hallmans,Göran, AU - Helzlsouer,Kathy J, AU - Hoffman-Bolton,Judy, AU - Hultén,Kerstin, AU - Sesso,Howard D, AU - Sowell,Anne L, AU - Tamimi,Rulla M, AU - Toniolo,Paolo, AU - Wilkens,Lynne R, AU - Winkvist,Anna, AU - Zeleniuch-Jacquotte,Anne, AU - Zheng,Wei, AU - Hankinson,Susan E, Y1 - 2012/12/06/ PY - 2012/12/11/entrez PY - 2012/12/12/pubmed PY - 2013/2/12/medline SP - 1905 EP - 16 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 104 IS - 24 N2 - BACKGROUND: Carotenoids, micronutrients in fruits and vegetables, may reduce breast cancer risk. Most, but not all, past studies of circulating carotenoids and breast cancer have found an inverse association with at least one carotenoid, although the specific carotenoid has varied across studies. METHODS: We conducted a pooled analysis of eight cohort studies comprising more than 80% of the world's published prospective data on plasma or serum carotenoids and breast cancer, including 3055 case subjects and 3956 matched control subjects. To account for laboratory differences and examine population differences across studies, we recalibrated participant carotenoid levels to a common standard by reassaying 20 plasma or serum samples from each cohort together at the same laboratory. Using conditional logistic regression, adjusting for several breast cancer risk factors, we calculated relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using quintiles defined among the control subjects from all studies. All P values are two-sided. RESULTS: Statistically significant inverse associations with breast cancer were observed for α-carotene (top vs bottom quintile RR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.71 to 1.05, P(trend) = .04), β-carotene (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.70 to 0.98, P(trend) = .02), lutein+zeaxanthin (RR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.70 to 1.01, P(trend) = .05), lycopene (RR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62 to 0.99, P(trend) = .02), and total carotenoids (RR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.68 to 0.96, P(trend) = .01). β-Cryptoxanthin was not statistically significantly associated with risk. Tests for heterogeneity across studies were not statistically significant. For several carotenoids, associations appeared stronger for estrogen receptor negative (ER(-)) than for ER(+) tumors (eg, β-carotene: ER(-): top vs bottom quintile RR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.36 to 0.77, P(trend) = .001; ER(+): RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.66 to 1.04, P(trend) = .06; P(heterogeneity) = .01). CONCLUSIONS: This comprehensive prospective analysis suggests women with higher circulating levels of α-carotene, β-carotene, lutein+zeaxanthin, lycopene, and total carotenoids may be at reduced risk of breast cancer. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23221879/Circulating_carotenoids_and_risk_of_breast_cancer:_pooled_analysis_of_eight_prospective_studies_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djs461 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -