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Coffee, tea, and fatal oral/pharyngeal cancer in a large prospective US cohort.
Am J Epidemiol 2013; 177(1):50-8AJ

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies suggest that coffee intake is associated with reduced risk of oral/pharyngeal cancer. The authors examined associations of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea intake with fatal oral/pharyngeal cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II, a prospective US cohort study begun in 1982 by the American Cancer Society. Among 968,432 men and women who were cancer free at enrollment, 868 deaths due to oral/pharyngeal cancer occurred during 26 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate multivariable-adjusted relative risk. Intake of >4 cups/day of caffeinated coffee was associated with a 49% lower risk of oral/pharyngeal cancer death relative to no/occasional coffee intake (relative risk = 0.51, 95% confidence interval: 0.40, 0.64) (1 cup/day = 237 ml). A dose-related decline in relative risk was observed with each single cup/day consumed (P(trend) < 0.001). The association was not modified by sex, smoking status, or alcohol use. An inverse association for >2 cups/day of decaffeinated coffee intake was suggested (relative risk = 0.61, 95% confidence interval: 0.37, 1.01). No association was found for tea drinking. In this large prospective study, caffeinated coffee intake was inversely associated with oral/pharyngeal cancer mortality. Research is needed to elucidate biologic mechanisms whereby coffee might help to protect against these often fatal cancers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, 250 Williams Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA. janet.hildebrand@cancer.org

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23230042

Citation

Hildebrand, Janet S., et al. "Coffee, Tea, and Fatal Oral/pharyngeal Cancer in a Large Prospective US Cohort." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 177, no. 1, 2013, pp. 50-8.
Hildebrand JS, Patel AV, McCullough ML, et al. Coffee, tea, and fatal oral/pharyngeal cancer in a large prospective US cohort. Am J Epidemiol. 2013;177(1):50-8.
Hildebrand, J. S., Patel, A. V., McCullough, M. L., Gaudet, M. M., Chen, A. Y., Hayes, R. B., & Gapstur, S. M. (2013). Coffee, tea, and fatal oral/pharyngeal cancer in a large prospective US cohort. American Journal of Epidemiology, 177(1), pp. 50-8. doi:10.1093/aje/kws222.
Hildebrand JS, et al. Coffee, Tea, and Fatal Oral/pharyngeal Cancer in a Large Prospective US Cohort. Am J Epidemiol. 2013 Jan 1;177(1):50-8. PubMed PMID: 23230042.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee, tea, and fatal oral/pharyngeal cancer in a large prospective US cohort. AU - Hildebrand,Janet S, AU - Patel,Alpa V, AU - McCullough,Marjorie L, AU - Gaudet,Mia M, AU - Chen,Amy Y, AU - Hayes,Richard B, AU - Gapstur,Susan M, Y1 - 2012/12/09/ PY - 2012/12/12/entrez PY - 2012/12/12/pubmed PY - 2013/2/26/medline SP - 50 EP - 8 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 177 IS - 1 N2 - Epidemiologic studies suggest that coffee intake is associated with reduced risk of oral/pharyngeal cancer. The authors examined associations of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea intake with fatal oral/pharyngeal cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II, a prospective US cohort study begun in 1982 by the American Cancer Society. Among 968,432 men and women who were cancer free at enrollment, 868 deaths due to oral/pharyngeal cancer occurred during 26 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate multivariable-adjusted relative risk. Intake of >4 cups/day of caffeinated coffee was associated with a 49% lower risk of oral/pharyngeal cancer death relative to no/occasional coffee intake (relative risk = 0.51, 95% confidence interval: 0.40, 0.64) (1 cup/day = 237 ml). A dose-related decline in relative risk was observed with each single cup/day consumed (P(trend) < 0.001). The association was not modified by sex, smoking status, or alcohol use. An inverse association for >2 cups/day of decaffeinated coffee intake was suggested (relative risk = 0.61, 95% confidence interval: 0.37, 1.01). No association was found for tea drinking. In this large prospective study, caffeinated coffee intake was inversely associated with oral/pharyngeal cancer mortality. Research is needed to elucidate biologic mechanisms whereby coffee might help to protect against these often fatal cancers. SN - 1476-6256 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23230042/Coffee_tea_and_fatal_oral/pharyngeal_cancer_in_a_large_prospective_US_cohort_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kws222 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -