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Same-sex legal marriage and psychological well-being: findings from the California Health Interview Survey.
Am J Public Health. 2013 Feb; 103(2):339-46.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We examined whether same-sex marriage was associated with nonspecific psychological distress among self-identified lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults, and whether it had the potential to offset mental health disparities between lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons and heterosexuals.

METHODS

Population-based data (weighted) were from the 2009 adult (aged 18-70 years) California Health Interview Survey. Within-group analysis of lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons included 1166 individuals (weighted proportion = 3.15%); within-group heterosexual analysis included 35 608 individuals (weighted proportion = 96.58%); and pooled analysis of lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons and heterosexuals included 36 774 individuals.

RESULTS

Same-sex married lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons were significantly less distressed than lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons not in a legally recognized relationship; married heterosexuals were significantly less distressed than nonmarried heterosexuals. In adjusted pairwise comparisons, married heterosexuals had the lowest psychological distress, and lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons who were not in legalized relationships had the highest psychological distress (P < .001). Psychological distress was not significantly distinguishable among same-sex married lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons, lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons in registered domestic partnerships, and heterosexuals.

CONCLUSIONS

Being in a legally recognized same-sex relationship, marriage in particular, appeared to diminish mental health differentials between heterosexuals and lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons. Researchers must continue to examine potential health benefits of same-sex marriage, which is at least in part a public health issue.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Health Sciences, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1772, USA. rwight@ucla.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23237155

Citation

Wight, Richard G., et al. "Same-sex Legal Marriage and Psychological Well-being: Findings From the California Health Interview Survey." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 103, no. 2, 2013, pp. 339-46.
Wight RG, Leblanc AJ, Lee Badgett MV. Same-sex legal marriage and psychological well-being: findings from the California Health Interview Survey. Am J Public Health. 2013;103(2):339-46.
Wight, R. G., Leblanc, A. J., & Lee Badgett, M. V. (2013). Same-sex legal marriage and psychological well-being: findings from the California Health Interview Survey. American Journal of Public Health, 103(2), 339-46. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2012.301113
Wight RG, Leblanc AJ, Lee Badgett MV. Same-sex Legal Marriage and Psychological Well-being: Findings From the California Health Interview Survey. Am J Public Health. 2013;103(2):339-46. PubMed PMID: 23237155.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Same-sex legal marriage and psychological well-being: findings from the California Health Interview Survey. AU - Wight,Richard G, AU - Leblanc,Allen J, AU - Lee Badgett,M V, Y1 - 2012/12/13/ PY - 2012/12/15/entrez PY - 2012/12/15/pubmed PY - 2013/3/30/medline SP - 339 EP - 46 JF - American journal of public health JO - Am J Public Health VL - 103 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We examined whether same-sex marriage was associated with nonspecific psychological distress among self-identified lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults, and whether it had the potential to offset mental health disparities between lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons and heterosexuals. METHODS: Population-based data (weighted) were from the 2009 adult (aged 18-70 years) California Health Interview Survey. Within-group analysis of lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons included 1166 individuals (weighted proportion = 3.15%); within-group heterosexual analysis included 35 608 individuals (weighted proportion = 96.58%); and pooled analysis of lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons and heterosexuals included 36 774 individuals. RESULTS: Same-sex married lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons were significantly less distressed than lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons not in a legally recognized relationship; married heterosexuals were significantly less distressed than nonmarried heterosexuals. In adjusted pairwise comparisons, married heterosexuals had the lowest psychological distress, and lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons who were not in legalized relationships had the highest psychological distress (P < .001). Psychological distress was not significantly distinguishable among same-sex married lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons, lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons in registered domestic partnerships, and heterosexuals. CONCLUSIONS: Being in a legally recognized same-sex relationship, marriage in particular, appeared to diminish mental health differentials between heterosexuals and lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons. Researchers must continue to examine potential health benefits of same-sex marriage, which is at least in part a public health issue. SN - 1541-0048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23237155/Same_sex_legal_marriage_and_psychological_well_being:_findings_from_the_California_Health_Interview_Survey_ L2 - https://www.ajph.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2012.301113?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -