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Micronutrient levels and nutritional status of school children living in Northwest Ethiopia.
Nutr J 2012; 11:108NJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several micronutrients are essential for adequate growth of children. However, little information is available on multiple micronutrient status of school children in Ethiopia. The present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between multiple micronutrient levels and nutritional status among school children.

METHOD

In this cross-sectional study, anthropometric data, blood and stool samples were collected from 100 children at Meseret Elementary School in Gondar town, Northwest Ethiopia. Serum concentration of magnesium, calcium, iron, copper, zinc, selenium and molybdenum were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Anthropometric indices of weight-for-age, height-for-age and BMI-for-age were used to estimate the children's nutritional status. Stool samples were examined by standard microscopic methods for intestinal parasites.

RESULTS

The prevalence of stunting, underweight, wasting and intestinal parasitoses among school children was 23%, 21%, 11% and 18%, respectively. The mean serum levels of magnesium, calcium, iron, copper, zinc, selenium and molybdenum were 2.42±0.32 (mg/dl), 15.31±2.14 (mg/dl), 328.19±148.91 (μg/dl), 191.30±50.17 (μg/dl), 86.40±42.40 (μg/dl), 6.32±2.59 (μg/dl), and 0.23±0.15 (μg/dl), respectively. Selenium deficiency, zinc deficiency and magnesium deficiency occurred in 62%, 47%, and 2% of the school children, respectively. Height-for-age showed significant positive correlation with the levels of copper and molybdenum (p = 0.01) and with the levels of magnesium (p = 0.05).

CONCLUSION

Deficiencies of selenium and zinc were high among the school children although the deficiencies were not significantly related with their nutritional status. The prevalence of both malnutrition and intestinal parasitism was not negligible. These calls for the need to undertake multicentre studies in various parts of the country to substantiate the data obtained in the present study so that appropriate and beneficial strategies for micronutrient supplementation and interventions on nutritional deficiencies can be planned.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Biochemistry, University of Gondar, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Gondar, Ethiopia. amarebem6@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23237638

Citation

Amare, Bemnet, et al. "Micronutrient Levels and Nutritional Status of School Children Living in Northwest Ethiopia." Nutrition Journal, vol. 11, 2012, p. 108.
Amare B, Moges B, Fantahun B, et al. Micronutrient levels and nutritional status of school children living in Northwest Ethiopia. Nutr J. 2012;11:108.
Amare, B., Moges, B., Fantahun, B., Tafess, K., Woldeyohannes, D., Yismaw, G., ... Kassu, A. (2012). Micronutrient levels and nutritional status of school children living in Northwest Ethiopia. Nutrition Journal, 11, p. 108. doi:10.1186/1475-2891-11-108.
Amare B, et al. Micronutrient Levels and Nutritional Status of School Children Living in Northwest Ethiopia. Nutr J. 2012 Dec 13;11:108. PubMed PMID: 23237638.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Micronutrient levels and nutritional status of school children living in Northwest Ethiopia. AU - Amare,Bemnet, AU - Moges,Beyene, AU - Fantahun,Bereket, AU - Tafess,Ketema, AU - Woldeyohannes,Desalegn, AU - Yismaw,Gizachew, AU - Ayane,Tilahun, AU - Yabutani,Tomoki, AU - Mulu,Andargachew, AU - Ota,Fusao, AU - Kassu,Afework, Y1 - 2012/12/13/ PY - 2012/09/18/received PY - 2012/12/06/accepted PY - 2012/12/15/entrez PY - 2012/12/15/pubmed PY - 2013/7/19/medline SP - 108 EP - 108 JF - Nutrition journal JO - Nutr J VL - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several micronutrients are essential for adequate growth of children. However, little information is available on multiple micronutrient status of school children in Ethiopia. The present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between multiple micronutrient levels and nutritional status among school children. METHOD: In this cross-sectional study, anthropometric data, blood and stool samples were collected from 100 children at Meseret Elementary School in Gondar town, Northwest Ethiopia. Serum concentration of magnesium, calcium, iron, copper, zinc, selenium and molybdenum were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Anthropometric indices of weight-for-age, height-for-age and BMI-for-age were used to estimate the children's nutritional status. Stool samples were examined by standard microscopic methods for intestinal parasites. RESULTS: The prevalence of stunting, underweight, wasting and intestinal parasitoses among school children was 23%, 21%, 11% and 18%, respectively. The mean serum levels of magnesium, calcium, iron, copper, zinc, selenium and molybdenum were 2.42±0.32 (mg/dl), 15.31±2.14 (mg/dl), 328.19±148.91 (μg/dl), 191.30±50.17 (μg/dl), 86.40±42.40 (μg/dl), 6.32±2.59 (μg/dl), and 0.23±0.15 (μg/dl), respectively. Selenium deficiency, zinc deficiency and magnesium deficiency occurred in 62%, 47%, and 2% of the school children, respectively. Height-for-age showed significant positive correlation with the levels of copper and molybdenum (p = 0.01) and with the levels of magnesium (p = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Deficiencies of selenium and zinc were high among the school children although the deficiencies were not significantly related with their nutritional status. The prevalence of both malnutrition and intestinal parasitism was not negligible. These calls for the need to undertake multicentre studies in various parts of the country to substantiate the data obtained in the present study so that appropriate and beneficial strategies for micronutrient supplementation and interventions on nutritional deficiencies can be planned. SN - 1475-2891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23237638/Micronutrient_levels_and_nutritional_status_of_school_children_living_in_Northwest_Ethiopia_ L2 - https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-11-108 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -