Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome: lessons from a large cohort from Israel.
Isr Med Assoc J. 2012 Nov; 14(11):676-80.IM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is a striking increase in the number of people with metabolic syndrome (MetS) as a result of the global epidemic of obesity and diabetes. Increasing evidence suggests that uric acid may play a role in MetS.

OBJECTIVES

To assess the prevalence of MetS in a large cohort from Israel and its association with hyperuricemia using the latest three definitions of MetS.

METHODS

We conducted a retrospective analysis of the database from a screening center in Israel, using the revised National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III), the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the Harmonizing definitions of MetS, to assess 12,036 subjects with an age range of 20-80 years.

RESULTS

The mean age of the study sample was 46.1 +/- 10.2 years and 69.8% were male. The prevalence of MetS was 10.6%, 18.2% and 20.2% in the revised NCEP ATP III, the IDF and the Harmonizing definitions respectively. The prevalence of hyperuricemia in subjects with MetS, for all three MetS definitions, was similar: 20.0%, 19.9% and 19.1% respectively. There was a graded increase in the prevalence of MetS among subjects with increasing levels of uric acid. The increasing trend persisted after stratifying for age and gender and after multivariate analysis (P for trend (0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

This large cohort shows a high prevalence of MetS in Israel, but is still lower than the prevalence in western countries. Hyperuricemia is common in those subjects and might be considered a potential clinical parameter in the definition of MetS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Recanati Center for Medicine and Research, Petah Tikva, Israel. dreytancohen@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23240372

Citation

Cohen, Eytan, et al. "Hyperuricemia and Metabolic Syndrome: Lessons From a Large Cohort From Israel." The Israel Medical Association Journal : IMAJ, vol. 14, no. 11, 2012, pp. 676-80.
Cohen E, Krause I, Fraser A, et al. Hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome: lessons from a large cohort from Israel. Isr Med Assoc J. 2012;14(11):676-80.
Cohen, E., Krause, I., Fraser, A., Goldberg, E., & Garty, M. (2012). Hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome: lessons from a large cohort from Israel. The Israel Medical Association Journal : IMAJ, 14(11), 676-80.
Cohen E, et al. Hyperuricemia and Metabolic Syndrome: Lessons From a Large Cohort From Israel. Isr Med Assoc J. 2012;14(11):676-80. PubMed PMID: 23240372.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome: lessons from a large cohort from Israel. AU - Cohen,Eytan, AU - Krause,Ilan, AU - Fraser,Abigail, AU - Goldberg,Elad, AU - Garty,Moshe, PY - 2012/12/18/entrez PY - 2012/12/18/pubmed PY - 2013/1/9/medline SP - 676 EP - 80 JF - The Israel Medical Association journal : IMAJ JO - Isr. Med. Assoc. J. VL - 14 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is a striking increase in the number of people with metabolic syndrome (MetS) as a result of the global epidemic of obesity and diabetes. Increasing evidence suggests that uric acid may play a role in MetS. OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of MetS in a large cohort from Israel and its association with hyperuricemia using the latest three definitions of MetS. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the database from a screening center in Israel, using the revised National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III), the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the Harmonizing definitions of MetS, to assess 12,036 subjects with an age range of 20-80 years. RESULTS: The mean age of the study sample was 46.1 +/- 10.2 years and 69.8% were male. The prevalence of MetS was 10.6%, 18.2% and 20.2% in the revised NCEP ATP III, the IDF and the Harmonizing definitions respectively. The prevalence of hyperuricemia in subjects with MetS, for all three MetS definitions, was similar: 20.0%, 19.9% and 19.1% respectively. There was a graded increase in the prevalence of MetS among subjects with increasing levels of uric acid. The increasing trend persisted after stratifying for age and gender and after multivariate analysis (P for trend (0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This large cohort shows a high prevalence of MetS in Israel, but is still lower than the prevalence in western countries. Hyperuricemia is common in those subjects and might be considered a potential clinical parameter in the definition of MetS. SN - 1565-1088 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23240372/Hyperuricemia_and_metabolic_syndrome:_lessons_from_a_large_cohort_from_Israel_ L2 - http://www.ima.org.il/IMAJ/ViewArticle.aspx?year=2012&month=11&page=676 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -