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Work productivity in relapsing multiple sclerosis: associations with disability, depression, fatigue, anxiety, cognition, and health-related quality of life.
Value Health 2012; 15(8):1029-35VH

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To characterize work productivity in relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) by using a work productivity scale and to identify associations between work productivity and disability, depression, fatigue, anxiety, cognition, and health-related quality of life.

METHODS

Three hundred seventy-seven subjects with a clinically isolated syndrome or relapsing remitting MS participated in the study. Subjects underwent neurological examinations and completed patient-reported outcome and cognitive measures. Subjects also completed the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire: General Health to quantify absenteeism (missing work because of health problems), presenteeism (impairment while working), overall work impairment, and daily activity impairment attributable to health problems. Univariate correlations and multivariate models were used to determine the associations between each work productivity variable and clinical, patient-reported outcome, and cognitive measures.

RESULTS

Seventy-six percent of subjects were employed. Fourteen percent of working subjects reported absenteeism, and 47% reported presenteeism. The mean work time lost because of absenteeism was 4%, and the mean work time lost because of presenteeism was 12%. Absenteeism was not significantly associated with disease or patient-reported outcome measures. Statistically significant correlations (0.32-0.53) were found between presenteeism and increasing disability, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and reduced quality of life. No associations were observed between presenteeism and disease duration or cognitive function.

CONCLUSIONS

Subjects with clinically isolated syndrome/relapsing remitting MS reported substantial work productivity losses due to presenteesim. Presenteeism was associated with increasing fatigue, depression, anxiety, and reduced quality of life. It is possible that the early identification and treatment of fatigue and mental health symptoms may improve productivity while working and extend employment for individuals with MS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. bglanz@partners.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23244804

Citation

Glanz, Bonnie I., et al. "Work Productivity in Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis: Associations With Disability, Depression, Fatigue, Anxiety, Cognition, and Health-related Quality of Life." Value in Health : the Journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, vol. 15, no. 8, 2012, pp. 1029-35.
Glanz BI, Dégano IR, Rintell DJ, et al. Work productivity in relapsing multiple sclerosis: associations with disability, depression, fatigue, anxiety, cognition, and health-related quality of life. Value Health. 2012;15(8):1029-35.
Glanz, B. I., Dégano, I. R., Rintell, D. J., Chitnis, T., Weiner, H. L., & Healy, B. C. (2012). Work productivity in relapsing multiple sclerosis: associations with disability, depression, fatigue, anxiety, cognition, and health-related quality of life. Value in Health : the Journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, 15(8), pp. 1029-35. doi:10.1016/j.jval.2012.07.010.
Glanz BI, et al. Work Productivity in Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis: Associations With Disability, Depression, Fatigue, Anxiety, Cognition, and Health-related Quality of Life. Value Health. 2012;15(8):1029-35. PubMed PMID: 23244804.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Work productivity in relapsing multiple sclerosis: associations with disability, depression, fatigue, anxiety, cognition, and health-related quality of life. AU - Glanz,Bonnie I, AU - Dégano,Irene R, AU - Rintell,David J, AU - Chitnis,Tanuja, AU - Weiner,Howard L, AU - Healy,Brian C, Y1 - 2012/10/25/ PY - 2012/02/15/received PY - 2012/07/19/revised PY - 2012/07/20/accepted PY - 2012/12/19/entrez PY - 2012/12/19/pubmed PY - 2013/2/21/medline SP - 1029 EP - 35 JF - Value in health : the journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research JO - Value Health VL - 15 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To characterize work productivity in relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) by using a work productivity scale and to identify associations between work productivity and disability, depression, fatigue, anxiety, cognition, and health-related quality of life. METHODS: Three hundred seventy-seven subjects with a clinically isolated syndrome or relapsing remitting MS participated in the study. Subjects underwent neurological examinations and completed patient-reported outcome and cognitive measures. Subjects also completed the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire: General Health to quantify absenteeism (missing work because of health problems), presenteeism (impairment while working), overall work impairment, and daily activity impairment attributable to health problems. Univariate correlations and multivariate models were used to determine the associations between each work productivity variable and clinical, patient-reported outcome, and cognitive measures. RESULTS: Seventy-six percent of subjects were employed. Fourteen percent of working subjects reported absenteeism, and 47% reported presenteeism. The mean work time lost because of absenteeism was 4%, and the mean work time lost because of presenteeism was 12%. Absenteeism was not significantly associated with disease or patient-reported outcome measures. Statistically significant correlations (0.32-0.53) were found between presenteeism and increasing disability, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and reduced quality of life. No associations were observed between presenteeism and disease duration or cognitive function. CONCLUSIONS: Subjects with clinically isolated syndrome/relapsing remitting MS reported substantial work productivity losses due to presenteesim. Presenteeism was associated with increasing fatigue, depression, anxiety, and reduced quality of life. It is possible that the early identification and treatment of fatigue and mental health symptoms may improve productivity while working and extend employment for individuals with MS. SN - 1524-4733 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23244804/Work_productivity_in_relapsing_multiple_sclerosis:_associations_with_disability_depression_fatigue_anxiety_cognition_and_health_related_quality_of_life_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1098-3015(12)01711-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -