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[Torticollis and seizures due to neuroborreliosis in a child].
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2012; 156(51):A5157.NT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In children, neuroborreliosis often manifests itself as cranial neuritis (particularly facial palsy) or aseptic meningitis. Presentation with torticollis and simple partial seizures resulting from diffuse leptomeningeal inflammation is rare.

CASE DESCRIPTION

A seven-year-old boy who had developed torticollis and partial seizures, lost weight and was complaining of tiredness was seen by a paediatric neurologist. A brain and spinal cord MRI showed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement, in combination with a hyperintense cervical cord lesion. Laboratory testing of serum and cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the diagnosis of neuroborreliosis. The boy was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for 30 days and made a full recovery.

CONCLUSION

As illustrated by this case neuroborreliosis can manifest itself atypically with torticollis, seizures and diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement due to inflammation. If there is leptomeningeal enhancement on MRI then neuroborreliosis should be included in the differential diagnosis. In childhood neuroborreliosis can be successfully treated and the prognosis is good.

Authors+Show Affiliations

VU Medisch Centrum Amsterdam, Afd. Kinderneurologie, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. mvanbreemen@casema.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

dut

PubMed ID

23249509

Citation

van Breemen, Mèlanie S M., et al. "[Torticollis and Seizures Due to Neuroborreliosis in a Child]." Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde, vol. 156, no. 51, 2012, pp. A5157.
van Breemen MS, van der Kuip M, Ang CW, et al. [Torticollis and seizures due to neuroborreliosis in a child]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2012;156(51):A5157.
van Breemen, M. S., van der Kuip, M., Ang, C. W., van Furth, A. M., & Wolf, N. I. (2012). [Torticollis and seizures due to neuroborreliosis in a child]. Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde, 156(51), A5157.
van Breemen MS, et al. [Torticollis and Seizures Due to Neuroborreliosis in a Child]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2012;156(51):A5157. PubMed PMID: 23249509.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Torticollis and seizures due to neuroborreliosis in a child]. AU - van Breemen,Mèlanie S M, AU - van der Kuip,Martijn, AU - Ang,C Wim, AU - van Furth,A Marceline, AU - Wolf,Nicole I, PY - 2012/12/20/entrez PY - 2012/12/20/pubmed PY - 2013/2/5/medline SP - A5157 EP - A5157 JF - Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde JO - Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd VL - 156 IS - 51 N2 - BACKGROUND: In children, neuroborreliosis often manifests itself as cranial neuritis (particularly facial palsy) or aseptic meningitis. Presentation with torticollis and simple partial seizures resulting from diffuse leptomeningeal inflammation is rare. CASE DESCRIPTION: A seven-year-old boy who had developed torticollis and partial seizures, lost weight and was complaining of tiredness was seen by a paediatric neurologist. A brain and spinal cord MRI showed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement, in combination with a hyperintense cervical cord lesion. Laboratory testing of serum and cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the diagnosis of neuroborreliosis. The boy was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for 30 days and made a full recovery. CONCLUSION: As illustrated by this case neuroborreliosis can manifest itself atypically with torticollis, seizures and diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement due to inflammation. If there is leptomeningeal enhancement on MRI then neuroborreliosis should be included in the differential diagnosis. In childhood neuroborreliosis can be successfully treated and the prognosis is good. SN - 1876-8784 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23249509/[Torticollis_and_seizures_due_to_neuroborreliosis_in_a_child]_ L2 - http://www.ntvg.nl/A5157 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -