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Gastrojejunal feeding tube use by gastroenterologists in a pediatric academic center.
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2013 May; 56(5):523-7.JP

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Enteral feeding through gastrojejunal (GJ) tubes is an established method of nutrition for patients with feeding difficulty who do not tolerate intragastric feedings. The pediatric literature about the long-term outcome, safety, and complications of different GJ tubes and placement methods is lacking. Our study aims to provide information about indications, techniques, and long-term outcome of GJ tube use in children.

METHODS

Retrospective chart review for GJ tube placement procedures was used at our center for 10 years (1999-2009). Data collected included demographics, placement indications, underlying diagnosis, tube type, placement methods, complications, tube survival, and patient outcome.

RESULTS

Thirty-three patients using GJ tubes were identified, with a total of 160 successful procedures documented (overall success rate of 97.6%). At initial placement, the mean age was 6 years (range 0.6-21.6) and the mean weight was 19.4 kg (range 6.6-72.2). Patients had a mean of 4.9 tubes placed per patient (range 1-20) during a follow-up of 26.8 months (range 0.4-115.3). The most common indications for replacement included accidental dislodgement, tube obstruction, coiling back into the stomach, and broken tube component. At the end of the study, 39% continued using GJ tubes, 30% were transitioned back to gastrostomy or oral feeds, and 15% underwent a surgical intervention.

CONCLUSIONS

Long-term GJ tube use is possible and safe in children. Various feeding tubes and placement methods can be used by pediatric gastroenterologists to provide long-term jejunal feeds in children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23254445

Citation

Al-Zubeidi, Dina, et al. "Gastrojejunal Feeding Tube Use By Gastroenterologists in a Pediatric Academic Center." Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, vol. 56, no. 5, 2013, pp. 523-7.
Al-Zubeidi D, Demir H, Bishop WP, et al. Gastrojejunal feeding tube use by gastroenterologists in a pediatric academic center. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2013;56(5):523-7.
Al-Zubeidi, D., Demir, H., Bishop, W. P., & Rahhal, R. M. (2013). Gastrojejunal feeding tube use by gastroenterologists in a pediatric academic center. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 56(5), 523-7. https://doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0b013e318282a8db
Al-Zubeidi D, et al. Gastrojejunal Feeding Tube Use By Gastroenterologists in a Pediatric Academic Center. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2013;56(5):523-7. PubMed PMID: 23254445.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gastrojejunal feeding tube use by gastroenterologists in a pediatric academic center. AU - Al-Zubeidi,Dina, AU - Demir,Hulya, AU - Bishop,Warren P, AU - Rahhal,Riad M, PY - 2012/12/21/entrez PY - 2012/12/21/pubmed PY - 2013/11/2/medline SP - 523 EP - 7 JF - Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition JO - J. Pediatr. Gastroenterol. Nutr. VL - 56 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Enteral feeding through gastrojejunal (GJ) tubes is an established method of nutrition for patients with feeding difficulty who do not tolerate intragastric feedings. The pediatric literature about the long-term outcome, safety, and complications of different GJ tubes and placement methods is lacking. Our study aims to provide information about indications, techniques, and long-term outcome of GJ tube use in children. METHODS: Retrospective chart review for GJ tube placement procedures was used at our center for 10 years (1999-2009). Data collected included demographics, placement indications, underlying diagnosis, tube type, placement methods, complications, tube survival, and patient outcome. RESULTS: Thirty-three patients using GJ tubes were identified, with a total of 160 successful procedures documented (overall success rate of 97.6%). At initial placement, the mean age was 6 years (range 0.6-21.6) and the mean weight was 19.4 kg (range 6.6-72.2). Patients had a mean of 4.9 tubes placed per patient (range 1-20) during a follow-up of 26.8 months (range 0.4-115.3). The most common indications for replacement included accidental dislodgement, tube obstruction, coiling back into the stomach, and broken tube component. At the end of the study, 39% continued using GJ tubes, 30% were transitioned back to gastrostomy or oral feeds, and 15% underwent a surgical intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term GJ tube use is possible and safe in children. Various feeding tubes and placement methods can be used by pediatric gastroenterologists to provide long-term jejunal feeds in children. SN - 1536-4801 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23254445/Gastrojejunal_feeding_tube_use_by_gastroenterologists_in_a_pediatric_academic_center_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0b013e318282a8db DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -