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The practicality and effectiveness of supplementary bright light for reducing jet-lag in elite female athletes.
Int J Sports Med. 2013 Jul; 34(7):582-9.IJ

Abstract

Although bright light can alter circadian timing, the practicality and effectiveness of supplementary bright light for reducing jet-lag symptoms in world-class athletes is unclear. Therefore, we randomised 22 world class female footballers to a bright light intervention or control group before a flight from USA to Europe. Intra-aural temperature, grip strength, sleep and various jet-lag symptoms were measured serially. For 4 days, the intervention participants were exposed, in pairs within their rooms, to 2 500 lux of bright light at ≈50 cm for 45-60 min at a time-of-day predicted to accelerate circadian adjustment. On post-flight day 1, indoor light transiently increased intra-aural temperature by 0.38°C (95%CI: 0.16 to 0.60, P=0.001) and increased overall jet-lag rating by ≈1 unit. Light had negligible effects on functioning, diet, bowel and sleep symptoms, which varied substantially between- and within-subjects. In conclusion, supplementary indoor light administered within the schedule of world-class athletes was not substantially effective for reducing jet-lag symptoms after a flight from the USA-Europe. Ours is the first study of the practical effectiveness of supplementary bright light in world class athletes, although sample size was naturally small, compromises were required to implement the intervention and there appears to be large inter-individual variation in the perception of what constitutes jet-lag.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial, Phase II
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23258609

Citation

Thompson, A, et al. "The Practicality and Effectiveness of Supplementary Bright Light for Reducing Jet-lag in Elite Female Athletes." International Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 34, no. 7, 2013, pp. 582-9.
Thompson A, Batterham AM, Jones H, et al. The practicality and effectiveness of supplementary bright light for reducing jet-lag in elite female athletes. Int J Sports Med. 2013;34(7):582-9.
Thompson, A., Batterham, A. M., Jones, H., Gregson, W., Scott, D., & Atkinson, G. (2013). The practicality and effectiveness of supplementary bright light for reducing jet-lag in elite female athletes. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 34(7), 582-9. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0032-1331160
Thompson A, et al. The Practicality and Effectiveness of Supplementary Bright Light for Reducing Jet-lag in Elite Female Athletes. Int J Sports Med. 2013;34(7):582-9. PubMed PMID: 23258609.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The practicality and effectiveness of supplementary bright light for reducing jet-lag in elite female athletes. AU - Thompson,A, AU - Batterham,A M, AU - Jones,H, AU - Gregson,W, AU - Scott,D, AU - Atkinson,G, Y1 - 2012/12/20/ PY - 2012/12/22/entrez PY - 2012/12/22/pubmed PY - 2014/2/11/medline SP - 582 EP - 9 JF - International journal of sports medicine JO - Int J Sports Med VL - 34 IS - 7 N2 - Although bright light can alter circadian timing, the practicality and effectiveness of supplementary bright light for reducing jet-lag symptoms in world-class athletes is unclear. Therefore, we randomised 22 world class female footballers to a bright light intervention or control group before a flight from USA to Europe. Intra-aural temperature, grip strength, sleep and various jet-lag symptoms were measured serially. For 4 days, the intervention participants were exposed, in pairs within their rooms, to 2 500 lux of bright light at ≈50 cm for 45-60 min at a time-of-day predicted to accelerate circadian adjustment. On post-flight day 1, indoor light transiently increased intra-aural temperature by 0.38°C (95%CI: 0.16 to 0.60, P=0.001) and increased overall jet-lag rating by ≈1 unit. Light had negligible effects on functioning, diet, bowel and sleep symptoms, which varied substantially between- and within-subjects. In conclusion, supplementary indoor light administered within the schedule of world-class athletes was not substantially effective for reducing jet-lag symptoms after a flight from the USA-Europe. Ours is the first study of the practical effectiveness of supplementary bright light in world class athletes, although sample size was naturally small, compromises were required to implement the intervention and there appears to be large inter-individual variation in the perception of what constitutes jet-lag. SN - 1439-3964 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23258609/full_citation L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0032-1331160 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -