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Oral Candida species in head and neck cancer patients treated by radiotherapy.
Auris Nasus Larynx. 2013 Aug; 40(4):400-4.AN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This paper aimed to identify and quantify Candida on head and neck irradiated patients with two comparative elderly populations.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Saliva was sampled from 29 head and neck irradiated patients (group 1) 34 non-institutionalized elderly patients (group 2) and 29 institutionalized elders (group 3) and matched by age. For quantification, the obtained saliva was sewed on CHROMagar Candida(®), which was used also for presumptive identification of Candida, API 20C AUX(®), microculture and RAPD (OPE-18) were used for the final identification.

RESULTS

Among the 92 patients surveyed, 51 (55.4%) had scores classified as positive for Candida, and among individuals of groups 1 and 3, 58.6% had Candida. There was higher positive/carrier conditions (CFU/sample) in groups 1 and 3, comparing with group 2 (P=0.011). Gender was not associated with Candida portability (P=0.334). Candida portability was significantly associated with the presence of candidosis (P=0.031) and xerostomic state (P=0.007). The isolates and definitive confirmed colonies were Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, Candida guilliermondii, Candida lusitaniae, and Candida kefyr. Among the species identified, C. albicans was the most frequent, followed by C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata. C. albicans was more prevalent in group 2 and 3, 45% and 41.2%, respectively, whereas, the most prevalent species in group 1 were C. tropicalis (27%), C. albicans and C. parapsilosis (16.2% for both). On multiple statistical models, only radiotherapic treatment was associated with positiveness to Candida.

CONCLUSIONS

Diversification and major prevalence of non-albicans species were observed in irradiated patients on head and neck and this treatment is straightly associated with fungus positiveness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Montes Claros, Minas Gerais, Brazil.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23260345

Citation

de Freitas, Edimilson M., et al. "Oral Candida Species in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated By Radiotherapy." Auris, Nasus, Larynx, vol. 40, no. 4, 2013, pp. 400-4.
de Freitas EM, Nobre SA, Pires MB, et al. Oral Candida species in head and neck cancer patients treated by radiotherapy. Auris Nasus Larynx. 2013;40(4):400-4.
de Freitas, E. M., Nobre, S. A., Pires, M. B., Faria, R. V., Batista, A. U., & Bonan, P. R. (2013). Oral Candida species in head and neck cancer patients treated by radiotherapy. Auris, Nasus, Larynx, 40(4), 400-4. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anl.2012.11.011
de Freitas EM, et al. Oral Candida Species in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated By Radiotherapy. Auris Nasus Larynx. 2013;40(4):400-4. PubMed PMID: 23260345.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oral Candida species in head and neck cancer patients treated by radiotherapy. AU - de Freitas,Edimilson M, AU - Nobre,Sérgio A M, AU - Pires,Maria Betânia de Oliveira, AU - Faria,Ronize Viviane J, AU - Batista,André Ulisses Dantas, AU - Bonan,Paulo Rogério Ferreti, Y1 - 2012/12/21/ PY - 2012/04/04/received PY - 2012/11/22/revised PY - 2012/11/27/accepted PY - 2012/12/25/entrez PY - 2012/12/25/pubmed PY - 2013/12/27/medline SP - 400 EP - 4 JF - Auris, nasus, larynx JO - Auris Nasus Larynx VL - 40 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This paper aimed to identify and quantify Candida on head and neck irradiated patients with two comparative elderly populations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Saliva was sampled from 29 head and neck irradiated patients (group 1) 34 non-institutionalized elderly patients (group 2) and 29 institutionalized elders (group 3) and matched by age. For quantification, the obtained saliva was sewed on CHROMagar Candida(®), which was used also for presumptive identification of Candida, API 20C AUX(®), microculture and RAPD (OPE-18) were used for the final identification. RESULTS: Among the 92 patients surveyed, 51 (55.4%) had scores classified as positive for Candida, and among individuals of groups 1 and 3, 58.6% had Candida. There was higher positive/carrier conditions (CFU/sample) in groups 1 and 3, comparing with group 2 (P=0.011). Gender was not associated with Candida portability (P=0.334). Candida portability was significantly associated with the presence of candidosis (P=0.031) and xerostomic state (P=0.007). The isolates and definitive confirmed colonies were Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, Candida guilliermondii, Candida lusitaniae, and Candida kefyr. Among the species identified, C. albicans was the most frequent, followed by C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata. C. albicans was more prevalent in group 2 and 3, 45% and 41.2%, respectively, whereas, the most prevalent species in group 1 were C. tropicalis (27%), C. albicans and C. parapsilosis (16.2% for both). On multiple statistical models, only radiotherapic treatment was associated with positiveness to Candida. CONCLUSIONS: Diversification and major prevalence of non-albicans species were observed in irradiated patients on head and neck and this treatment is straightly associated with fungus positiveness. SN - 1879-1476 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23260345/Oral_Candida_species_in_head_and_neck_cancer_patients_treated_by_radiotherapy_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0385-8146(12)00235-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -