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Regular-soda intake independent of weight status is associated with asthma among US high school students.

Abstract

Limited research shows an inconclusive association between soda intake and asthma, potentially attributable to certain preservatives in sodas. This cross-sectional study examined the association between regular (nondiet)-soda intake and current asthma among a nationally representative sample of high school students. Analysis was based on the 2009 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey and included 15,960 students (grades 9 through 12) with data for both regular-soda intake and current asthma status. The outcome measure was current asthma (ie, told by doctor/nurse that they had asthma and still have asthma). The main exposure variable was regular-soda intake (ie, drank a can/bottle/glass of soda during the 7 days before the survey). Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the adjusted odds ratios for regular-soda intake with current asthma after controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, weight status, and current cigarette use. Overall, 10.8% of students had current asthma. In addition, 9.7% of students who did not drink regular soda had current asthma, and 14.7% of students who drank regular soda three or more times per day had current asthma. Compared with those who did not drink regular soda, odds of having current asthma were higher among students who drank regular soda two times per day (adjusted odds ratio=1.28; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.62) and three or more times per day (adjusted odds ratio=1.64; 95% CI 1.25 to 2.16). The association between high regular-soda intake and current asthma suggests efforts to reduce regular-soda intake among youth might have benefits beyond improving diet quality. However, this association needs additional research, such as a longitudinal examination.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Mailstop K26, 4770 Buford Highway, NE, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. spark3@cdc.gov

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    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adolescent Behavior
    Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
    Asthma
    Body Weight
    Carbonated Beverages
    Female
    Food Preservatives
    Health Behavior
    Humans
    Logistic Models
    Male
    Odds Ratio
    Overweight
    Risk Factors
    Risk-Taking
    Schools
    Smoking
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23260727

    Citation

    Park, Sohyun, et al. "Regular-soda Intake Independent of Weight Status Is Associated With Asthma Among US High School Students." Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, vol. 113, no. 1, 2013, pp. 106-11.
    Park S, Blanck HM, Sherry B, et al. Regular-soda intake independent of weight status is associated with asthma among US high school students. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013;113(1):106-11.
    Park, S., Blanck, H. M., Sherry, B., Jones, S. E., & Pan, L. (2013). Regular-soda intake independent of weight status is associated with asthma among US high school students. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 113(1), pp. 106-11. doi:10.1016/j.jand.2012.09.020.
    Park S, et al. Regular-soda Intake Independent of Weight Status Is Associated With Asthma Among US High School Students. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013;113(1):106-11. PubMed PMID: 23260727.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Regular-soda intake independent of weight status is associated with asthma among US high school students. AU - Park,Sohyun, AU - Blanck,Heidi M, AU - Sherry,Bettylou, AU - Jones,Sherry Everett, AU - Pan,Liping, PY - 2012/03/20/received PY - 2012/09/21/accepted PY - 2012/12/25/entrez PY - 2012/12/25/pubmed PY - 2013/2/13/medline SP - 106 EP - 11 JF - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics JO - J Acad Nutr Diet VL - 113 IS - 1 N2 - Limited research shows an inconclusive association between soda intake and asthma, potentially attributable to certain preservatives in sodas. This cross-sectional study examined the association between regular (nondiet)-soda intake and current asthma among a nationally representative sample of high school students. Analysis was based on the 2009 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey and included 15,960 students (grades 9 through 12) with data for both regular-soda intake and current asthma status. The outcome measure was current asthma (ie, told by doctor/nurse that they had asthma and still have asthma). The main exposure variable was regular-soda intake (ie, drank a can/bottle/glass of soda during the 7 days before the survey). Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the adjusted odds ratios for regular-soda intake with current asthma after controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, weight status, and current cigarette use. Overall, 10.8% of students had current asthma. In addition, 9.7% of students who did not drink regular soda had current asthma, and 14.7% of students who drank regular soda three or more times per day had current asthma. Compared with those who did not drink regular soda, odds of having current asthma were higher among students who drank regular soda two times per day (adjusted odds ratio=1.28; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.62) and three or more times per day (adjusted odds ratio=1.64; 95% CI 1.25 to 2.16). The association between high regular-soda intake and current asthma suggests efforts to reduce regular-soda intake among youth might have benefits beyond improving diet quality. However, this association needs additional research, such as a longitudinal examination. SN - 2212-2672 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23260727/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2212-2672(12)01647-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -