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Characteristics associated with consumption of sports and energy drinks among US adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2010.
J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Jan; 113(1):112-9.JA

Abstract

Sales of sports and energy drinks have increased dramatically, but there is limited information on regular consumers of sports and energy drinks. Characteristics associated with sports and energy drink intake were examined among a sample representing the civilian noninstitutionalized US adult population. The 2010 National Health Interview Survey data for 25,492 adults (18 years of age or older; 48% males) were used. Nationwide, 31.3% of adults were sports and energy drink consumers during the past 7 days, with 21.5% consuming sports and energy drinks one or more times per week and 11.5% consuming sports and energy drinks three or more times per week. Based on multivariable logistic regression, younger adults, males, non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics, not-married individuals, adults with higher family income, those who lived in the South or West, adults who engaged in leisure-time physical activity, current smokers, and individuals whose satisfaction with their social activities/relationships was excellent had significantly higher odds for drinking sports and energy drinks one or more times per week. In this model, the factor most strongly associated with weekly sports and energy drink consumption was age (odds ratio [OR]=10.70 for 18- to 24-year-olds, OR=6.40 for 25- to 39-year-olds, OR=3.17 for 40- to 59-year-olds vs 60 years or older). Lower odds for consuming sports and energy drinks one or more times per week were associated with other/multiracial (OR=0.80 vs non-Hispanic white) and obesity (OR=0.87 vs underweight/normal weight). Separate modeling of the association between other beverage intake and sports and energy drink intake showed that higher intake of regular soda, sweetened coffee/tea drinks, fruit drinks, milk, 100% fruit juice, and alcohol were significantly associated with greater odds for drinking sports and energy drinks one or more times per week. These findings can help medical care providers and public health officials identify adults most in need of encouragement to reduce sports and energy drink intake and increase healthier beverage intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, Mailstop K26, NE, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. spark3@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23260728

Citation

Park, Sohyun, et al. "Characteristics Associated With Consumption of Sports and Energy Drinks Among US Adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2010." Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, vol. 113, no. 1, 2013, pp. 112-9.
Park S, Onufrak S, Blanck HM, et al. Characteristics associated with consumption of sports and energy drinks among US adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2010. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013;113(1):112-9.
Park, S., Onufrak, S., Blanck, H. M., & Sherry, B. (2013). Characteristics associated with consumption of sports and energy drinks among US adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2010. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 113(1), 112-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2012.09.019
Park S, et al. Characteristics Associated With Consumption of Sports and Energy Drinks Among US Adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2010. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013;113(1):112-9. PubMed PMID: 23260728.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Characteristics associated with consumption of sports and energy drinks among US adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2010. AU - Park,Sohyun, AU - Onufrak,Stephen, AU - Blanck,Heidi M, AU - Sherry,Bettylou, PY - 2012/05/01/received PY - 2012/09/17/accepted PY - 2012/12/25/entrez PY - 2012/12/25/pubmed PY - 2013/2/13/medline SP - 112 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics JO - J Acad Nutr Diet VL - 113 IS - 1 N2 - Sales of sports and energy drinks have increased dramatically, but there is limited information on regular consumers of sports and energy drinks. Characteristics associated with sports and energy drink intake were examined among a sample representing the civilian noninstitutionalized US adult population. The 2010 National Health Interview Survey data for 25,492 adults (18 years of age or older; 48% males) were used. Nationwide, 31.3% of adults were sports and energy drink consumers during the past 7 days, with 21.5% consuming sports and energy drinks one or more times per week and 11.5% consuming sports and energy drinks three or more times per week. Based on multivariable logistic regression, younger adults, males, non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics, not-married individuals, adults with higher family income, those who lived in the South or West, adults who engaged in leisure-time physical activity, current smokers, and individuals whose satisfaction with their social activities/relationships was excellent had significantly higher odds for drinking sports and energy drinks one or more times per week. In this model, the factor most strongly associated with weekly sports and energy drink consumption was age (odds ratio [OR]=10.70 for 18- to 24-year-olds, OR=6.40 for 25- to 39-year-olds, OR=3.17 for 40- to 59-year-olds vs 60 years or older). Lower odds for consuming sports and energy drinks one or more times per week were associated with other/multiracial (OR=0.80 vs non-Hispanic white) and obesity (OR=0.87 vs underweight/normal weight). Separate modeling of the association between other beverage intake and sports and energy drink intake showed that higher intake of regular soda, sweetened coffee/tea drinks, fruit drinks, milk, 100% fruit juice, and alcohol were significantly associated with greater odds for drinking sports and energy drinks one or more times per week. These findings can help medical care providers and public health officials identify adults most in need of encouragement to reduce sports and energy drink intake and increase healthier beverage intake. SN - 2212-2672 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23260728/Characteristics_associated_with_consumption_of_sports_and_energy_drinks_among_US_adults:_National_Health_Interview_Survey_2010_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2212-2672(12)01646-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -