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Rhinovirus and other respiratory viruses exert different effects on lung allograft function that are not mediated through acute rejection.
Clin Transplant. 2013 Jan-Feb; 27(1):E64-71.CT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Community acquired respiratory virus (CARV) infections in lung transplant recipients (LTR) have been associated with adverse outcomes, including acute rejection (AR) and decline in allograft function, in some but not in all studies.

METHODS

Spirometry and transbronchial biopsy results of LTR diagnosed with CARV infection over a two-yr period were extracted from clinical records. Primary outcomes, studied at 1-2.5 months postinfection, were as follows: (i) incidence of biopsy-proven AR (grade >A0) and (ii) allograft function, defined by forced expiratory volume in one s (FEV(1)). A reference group of biopsies (n = 526) collected during the study period established the baseline incidence of AR. Rhinovirus (RV) and non-rhinovirus (non-RV) infections were analyzed as subgroups.

RESULTS

Eighty-seven cases of CARV infection were identified in 59 subjects. Incidences of AR were similar in the post-CARV and reference groups and did not differ significantly after RV vs. non-RV infection. Allograft function declined significantly after non-RV infection, but not after RV infection.

CONCLUSIONS

In LTR, CARV infections other than RV are associated with allograft dysfunction at 1-2.5 months after infection. However, CARVs do not appear associated with AR at this time point. The impact of specific CARVs on lung allografts, including the development of chronic allograft rejection, merits further study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. dsayah@mednet.ucla.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23278569

Citation

Sayah, David M., et al. "Rhinovirus and Other Respiratory Viruses Exert Different Effects On Lung Allograft Function That Are Not Mediated Through Acute Rejection." Clinical Transplantation, vol. 27, no. 1, 2013, pp. E64-71.
Sayah DM, Koff JL, Leard LE, et al. Rhinovirus and other respiratory viruses exert different effects on lung allograft function that are not mediated through acute rejection. Clin Transplant. 2013;27(1):E64-71.
Sayah, D. M., Koff, J. L., Leard, L. E., Hays, S. R., Golden, J. A., & Singer, J. P. (2013). Rhinovirus and other respiratory viruses exert different effects on lung allograft function that are not mediated through acute rejection. Clinical Transplantation, 27(1), E64-71. https://doi.org/10.1111/ctr.12054
Sayah DM, et al. Rhinovirus and Other Respiratory Viruses Exert Different Effects On Lung Allograft Function That Are Not Mediated Through Acute Rejection. Clin Transplant. 2013 Jan-Feb;27(1):E64-71. PubMed PMID: 23278569.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rhinovirus and other respiratory viruses exert different effects on lung allograft function that are not mediated through acute rejection. AU - Sayah,David M, AU - Koff,Jonathan L, AU - Leard,Lorriana E, AU - Hays,Steven R, AU - Golden,Jeffrey A, AU - Singer,Jonathan P, Y1 - 2012/12/30/ PY - 2012/10/17/accepted PY - 2013/1/3/entrez PY - 2013/1/3/pubmed PY - 2013/7/26/medline SP - E64 EP - 71 JF - Clinical transplantation JO - Clin Transplant VL - 27 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Community acquired respiratory virus (CARV) infections in lung transplant recipients (LTR) have been associated with adverse outcomes, including acute rejection (AR) and decline in allograft function, in some but not in all studies. METHODS: Spirometry and transbronchial biopsy results of LTR diagnosed with CARV infection over a two-yr period were extracted from clinical records. Primary outcomes, studied at 1-2.5 months postinfection, were as follows: (i) incidence of biopsy-proven AR (grade >A0) and (ii) allograft function, defined by forced expiratory volume in one s (FEV(1)). A reference group of biopsies (n = 526) collected during the study period established the baseline incidence of AR. Rhinovirus (RV) and non-rhinovirus (non-RV) infections were analyzed as subgroups. RESULTS: Eighty-seven cases of CARV infection were identified in 59 subjects. Incidences of AR were similar in the post-CARV and reference groups and did not differ significantly after RV vs. non-RV infection. Allograft function declined significantly after non-RV infection, but not after RV infection. CONCLUSIONS: In LTR, CARV infections other than RV are associated with allograft dysfunction at 1-2.5 months after infection. However, CARVs do not appear associated with AR at this time point. The impact of specific CARVs on lung allografts, including the development of chronic allograft rejection, merits further study. SN - 1399-0012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23278569/Rhinovirus_and_other_respiratory_viruses_exert_different_effects_on_lung_allograft_function_that_are_not_mediated_through_acute_rejection_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ctr.12054 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -