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Long-term trends in the Oxford knee score following total knee replacement.
Bone Joint J. 2013 Jan; 95-B(1):45-51.BJ

Abstract

The Oxford knee score (OKS) is a validated and widely accepted disease-specific patient-reported outcome measure, but there is limited evidence regarding any long-term trends in the score. We reviewed 5600 individual OKS questionnaires (1547 patients) from a prospectively-collected knee replacement database, to determine the trends in OKS over a ten-year period following total knee replacement. The mean OKS pre-operatively was 19.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 18.8 to 20.2). The maximum post-operative OKS was observed at two years (mean score 34.4 (95% CI 33.7 to 35.2)), following which a gradual but significant decline was observed through to the ten-year assessment (mean score 30.1 (95% CI 29.1 to 31.1)) (p < 0.001). A similar trend was observed for most of the individual OKS components (p < 0.001). Kneeling ability initially improved in the first year but was then followed by rapid deterioration (p < 0.001). Pain severity exhibited the greatest improvement, although residual pain was reported in over two-thirds of patients post-operatively, and peak improvement in the night pain component did not occur until year four. Post-operative OKS was lower for women (p < 0.001), those aged < 60 years (p < 0.003) and those with a body mass index > 35 kg/m(2) (p < 0.014), although similar changes in scores were observed. This information may assist surgeons in advising patients of their expected outcomes, as well as providing a comparative benchmark for evaluating longer-term outcomes following knee replacement.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, BOTNAR Research Centre, University of Oxford, Windmill Road, Oxford OX3 7LD, UK. derfel.williams@ndorms.ox.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23307672

Citation

Williams, D P., et al. "Long-term Trends in the Oxford Knee Score Following Total Knee Replacement." The Bone & Joint Journal, vol. 95-B, no. 1, 2013, pp. 45-51.
Williams DP, Blakey CM, Hadfield SG, et al. Long-term trends in the Oxford knee score following total knee replacement. Bone Joint J. 2013;95-B(1):45-51.
Williams, D. P., Blakey, C. M., Hadfield, S. G., Murray, D. W., Price, A. J., & Field, R. E. (2013). Long-term trends in the Oxford knee score following total knee replacement. The Bone & Joint Journal, 95-B(1), 45-51. https://doi.org/10.1302/0301-620X.95B1.28573
Williams DP, et al. Long-term Trends in the Oxford Knee Score Following Total Knee Replacement. Bone Joint J. 2013;95-B(1):45-51. PubMed PMID: 23307672.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term trends in the Oxford knee score following total knee replacement. AU - Williams,D P, AU - Blakey,C M, AU - Hadfield,S G, AU - Murray,D W, AU - Price,A J, AU - Field,R E, PY - 2013/1/12/entrez PY - 2013/1/12/pubmed PY - 2013/3/12/medline SP - 45 EP - 51 JF - The bone & joint journal JO - Bone Joint J VL - 95-B IS - 1 N2 - The Oxford knee score (OKS) is a validated and widely accepted disease-specific patient-reported outcome measure, but there is limited evidence regarding any long-term trends in the score. We reviewed 5600 individual OKS questionnaires (1547 patients) from a prospectively-collected knee replacement database, to determine the trends in OKS over a ten-year period following total knee replacement. The mean OKS pre-operatively was 19.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 18.8 to 20.2). The maximum post-operative OKS was observed at two years (mean score 34.4 (95% CI 33.7 to 35.2)), following which a gradual but significant decline was observed through to the ten-year assessment (mean score 30.1 (95% CI 29.1 to 31.1)) (p < 0.001). A similar trend was observed for most of the individual OKS components (p < 0.001). Kneeling ability initially improved in the first year but was then followed by rapid deterioration (p < 0.001). Pain severity exhibited the greatest improvement, although residual pain was reported in over two-thirds of patients post-operatively, and peak improvement in the night pain component did not occur until year four. Post-operative OKS was lower for women (p < 0.001), those aged < 60 years (p < 0.003) and those with a body mass index > 35 kg/m(2) (p < 0.014), although similar changes in scores were observed. This information may assist surgeons in advising patients of their expected outcomes, as well as providing a comparative benchmark for evaluating longer-term outcomes following knee replacement. SN - 2049-4408 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23307672/Long_term_trends_in_the_Oxford_knee_score_following_total_knee_replacement_ L2 - https://online.boneandjoint.org.uk/doi/full/10.1302/0301-620X.95B1.28573?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -