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Microbiology and epidemiology of oral yeast colonization in hemopoietic progenitor cell transplant recipients.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We monitored the epidemiology and microbiology of oral yeast colonization in patients undergoing hemopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (HPCT) to examine associations between yeast colonization and oral mucositis.

STUDY DESIGN

One hundred twenty-one consecutive HPCT patients were sampled for oral yeasts prior to fluconazole (FLC) prophylaxis, at transplantation, and weekly until discharge. Clinical oral mucositis screenings were performed triweekly.

RESULTS

Yeast colonization was evident at 216 of 510 total visits. Candida albicans and Candida glabrata were the predominant organisms. Eight patients showed elevated minimal inhibitory concentrations to FLC. One patient developed fungal septicemia. Patients with oral mucositis assessment scale scores <20 had higher colonization rates than those with higher scores.

CONCLUSIONS

FLC is effective in controlling a variety of oral yeasts in HPCT recipients. FLC-resistant yeasts do emerge and can be the source of fungal sepsis. A positive association was not shown between yeast colonization and the presence or severity of oral mucositis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Comprehensive Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229-390, USA. westbrooks@uthscsa.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23312542

Citation

Westbrook, Steven D., et al. "Microbiology and Epidemiology of Oral Yeast Colonization in Hemopoietic Progenitor Cell Transplant Recipients." Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, vol. 115, no. 3, 2013, pp. 354-8.
Westbrook SD, Kirkpatrick WR, Wiederhold NP, et al. Microbiology and epidemiology of oral yeast colonization in hemopoietic progenitor cell transplant recipients. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol. 2013;115(3):354-8.
Westbrook, S. D., Kirkpatrick, W. R., Wiederhold, N. P., Freytes, C. O., Toro, J. J., Patterson, T. F., & Redding, S. W. (2013). Microbiology and epidemiology of oral yeast colonization in hemopoietic progenitor cell transplant recipients. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, 115(3), 354-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2012.10.012
Westbrook SD, et al. Microbiology and Epidemiology of Oral Yeast Colonization in Hemopoietic Progenitor Cell Transplant Recipients. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol. 2013;115(3):354-8. PubMed PMID: 23312542.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microbiology and epidemiology of oral yeast colonization in hemopoietic progenitor cell transplant recipients. AU - Westbrook,Steven D, AU - Kirkpatrick,William R, AU - Wiederhold,Nathan P, AU - Freytes,Cesar O, AU - Toro,Juan J, AU - Patterson,Thomas F, AU - Redding,Spencer W, Y1 - 2013/01/09/ PY - 2012/08/09/received PY - 2012/10/09/revised PY - 2012/10/19/accepted PY - 2013/1/15/entrez PY - 2013/1/15/pubmed PY - 2013/9/21/medline SP - 354 EP - 8 JF - Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology and oral radiology JO - Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol VL - 115 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We monitored the epidemiology and microbiology of oral yeast colonization in patients undergoing hemopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (HPCT) to examine associations between yeast colonization and oral mucositis. STUDY DESIGN: One hundred twenty-one consecutive HPCT patients were sampled for oral yeasts prior to fluconazole (FLC) prophylaxis, at transplantation, and weekly until discharge. Clinical oral mucositis screenings were performed triweekly. RESULTS: Yeast colonization was evident at 216 of 510 total visits. Candida albicans and Candida glabrata were the predominant organisms. Eight patients showed elevated minimal inhibitory concentrations to FLC. One patient developed fungal septicemia. Patients with oral mucositis assessment scale scores <20 had higher colonization rates than those with higher scores. CONCLUSIONS: FLC is effective in controlling a variety of oral yeasts in HPCT recipients. FLC-resistant yeasts do emerge and can be the source of fungal sepsis. A positive association was not shown between yeast colonization and the presence or severity of oral mucositis. SN - 2212-4411 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23312542/Microbiology_and_epidemiology_of_oral_yeast_colonization_in_hemopoietic_progenitor_cell_transplant_recipients_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2212-4403(12)01646-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -