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Subtype of dietary fat in relation to risk of Hodgkin lymphoma: a population-based case-control study in Connecticut and Massachusetts.
Cancer Causes Control 2013; 24(3):485-94CC

Abstract

Few epidemiological studies have examined the relationship between dietary fat, which may affect immune function and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that high dietary intake of fat and specific subtypes of fat is associated with the risk of HL among 486 HL cases and 630 population-based controls recruited between 1997 and 2000 in Connecticut and Massachusetts. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) stratified by age and gender. Among younger adults, HL risk was significantly and positively associated with higher intake of saturated fat [ORs for increasing quartiles = 1.3, 1.8, and 2.1; p trend = 0.04] and negatively associated with higher intake of monounsaturated fat [ORs for increasing quartiles = 0.5, 0.5, and 0.4; p trend = 0.03), after adjustment for potential confounders including lifestyle and other dietary factors. The associations with saturated fat (ORs for increasing quartile = 2.4, 3.2, and 4.4; p trend < 0.01] and monounsaturated fat (ORs for increasing quartile = 0.3, 0.6, and 0.3; p trend = 0.04) were most apparent in younger women, whereas there was no significant association between intake of total fat or any type of fat and risk of HL in older females or younger or older males. These findings show that the associations between dietary fat and risk of HL may vary by gender and age and require confirmation in other populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23314676

Citation

Gao, Yongshun, et al. "Subtype of Dietary Fat in Relation to Risk of Hodgkin Lymphoma: a Population-based Case-control Study in Connecticut and Massachusetts." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 24, no. 3, 2013, pp. 485-94.
Gao Y, Li Q, Bassig BA, et al. Subtype of dietary fat in relation to risk of Hodgkin lymphoma: a population-based case-control study in Connecticut and Massachusetts. Cancer Causes Control. 2013;24(3):485-94.
Gao, Y., Li, Q., Bassig, B. A., Chang, E. T., Dai, M., Qin, Q., ... Zheng, T. (2013). Subtype of dietary fat in relation to risk of Hodgkin lymphoma: a population-based case-control study in Connecticut and Massachusetts. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 24(3), pp. 485-94. doi:10.1007/s10552-012-0136-2.
Gao Y, et al. Subtype of Dietary Fat in Relation to Risk of Hodgkin Lymphoma: a Population-based Case-control Study in Connecticut and Massachusetts. Cancer Causes Control. 2013;24(3):485-94. PubMed PMID: 23314676.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Subtype of dietary fat in relation to risk of Hodgkin lymphoma: a population-based case-control study in Connecticut and Massachusetts. AU - Gao,Yongshun, AU - Li,Qian, AU - Bassig,Bryan A, AU - Chang,Ellen T, AU - Dai,Min, AU - Qin,Qin, AU - Zhang,Yawei, AU - Zheng,Tongzhang, Y1 - 2013/01/12/ PY - 2012/09/04/received PY - 2012/12/17/accepted PY - 2013/1/15/entrez PY - 2013/1/15/pubmed PY - 2013/12/16/medline SP - 485 EP - 94 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 24 IS - 3 N2 - Few epidemiological studies have examined the relationship between dietary fat, which may affect immune function and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that high dietary intake of fat and specific subtypes of fat is associated with the risk of HL among 486 HL cases and 630 population-based controls recruited between 1997 and 2000 in Connecticut and Massachusetts. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) stratified by age and gender. Among younger adults, HL risk was significantly and positively associated with higher intake of saturated fat [ORs for increasing quartiles = 1.3, 1.8, and 2.1; p trend = 0.04] and negatively associated with higher intake of monounsaturated fat [ORs for increasing quartiles = 0.5, 0.5, and 0.4; p trend = 0.03), after adjustment for potential confounders including lifestyle and other dietary factors. The associations with saturated fat (ORs for increasing quartile = 2.4, 3.2, and 4.4; p trend < 0.01] and monounsaturated fat (ORs for increasing quartile = 0.3, 0.6, and 0.3; p trend = 0.04) were most apparent in younger women, whereas there was no significant association between intake of total fat or any type of fat and risk of HL in older females or younger or older males. These findings show that the associations between dietary fat and risk of HL may vary by gender and age and require confirmation in other populations. SN - 1573-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23314676/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-012-0136-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -