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Cutaneous manifestations of gastrointestinal disease: part I.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2013; 68(2):189.e1-21; quiz 210JA

Abstract

Cutaneous findings are not uncommonly a concomitant finding in patients afflicted with gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. The dermatologic manifestations may precede clinically evident GI disease. Part I of this 2-part CME review focuses on dermatologic findings as they relate to hereditary and nonhereditary polyposis disorders and paraneoplastic disorders. A number of hereditary GI disorders have an increased risk of colorectal carcinomas. These disorders include familial adenomatous polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and juvenile polyposis syndrome. Each disease has its own cutaneous signature that aids dermatologists in the early diagnosis and detection of hereditary GI malignancy. These disease processes are associated with particular gene mutations that can be used in screening and to guide additional genetic counseling. In addition, there is a group of hamartomatous syndromes, some of which are associated with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene mutations, which present with concurrent skin findings. These include Cowden syndrome, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and Cronkhite-Canada syndrome. Finally, paraneoplastic disorders are another subcategory of GI diseases associated with cutaneous manifestations, including malignant acanthosis nigricans, Leser-Trélat sign, tylosis, Plummer-Vinson syndrome, necrolytic migratory erythema, perianal extramammary Paget disease, carcinoid syndrome, paraneoplastic dermatomyositis, and paraneoplastic pemphigus. Each of these disease processes have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of GI malignancy. This underscores the important role of dermatologists in the diagnosis, detection, monitoring, and treatment of these disorders while consulting and interacting with their GI colleagues.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75246, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23317980

Citation

Shah, Kejal R., et al. "Cutaneous Manifestations of Gastrointestinal Disease: Part I." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, vol. 68, no. 2, 2013, pp. 189.e1-21; quiz 210.
Shah KR, Boland CR, Patel M, et al. Cutaneous manifestations of gastrointestinal disease: part I. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013;68(2):189.e1-21; quiz 210.
Shah, K. R., Boland, C. R., Patel, M., Thrash, B., & Menter, A. (2013). Cutaneous manifestations of gastrointestinal disease: part I. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 68(2), pp. 189.e1-21; quiz 210. doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2012.10.037.
Shah KR, et al. Cutaneous Manifestations of Gastrointestinal Disease: Part I. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013;68(2):189.e1-21; quiz 210. PubMed PMID: 23317980.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cutaneous manifestations of gastrointestinal disease: part I. AU - Shah,Kejal R, AU - Boland,C Richard, AU - Patel,Mahir, AU - Thrash,Breck, AU - Menter,Alan, PY - 2011/11/02/received PY - 2012/10/11/revised PY - 2012/10/13/accepted PY - 2013/1/16/entrez PY - 2013/1/16/pubmed PY - 2013/3/8/medline SP - 189.e1-21; quiz 210 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology JO - J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. VL - 68 IS - 2 N2 - Cutaneous findings are not uncommonly a concomitant finding in patients afflicted with gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. The dermatologic manifestations may precede clinically evident GI disease. Part I of this 2-part CME review focuses on dermatologic findings as they relate to hereditary and nonhereditary polyposis disorders and paraneoplastic disorders. A number of hereditary GI disorders have an increased risk of colorectal carcinomas. These disorders include familial adenomatous polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and juvenile polyposis syndrome. Each disease has its own cutaneous signature that aids dermatologists in the early diagnosis and detection of hereditary GI malignancy. These disease processes are associated with particular gene mutations that can be used in screening and to guide additional genetic counseling. In addition, there is a group of hamartomatous syndromes, some of which are associated with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene mutations, which present with concurrent skin findings. These include Cowden syndrome, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and Cronkhite-Canada syndrome. Finally, paraneoplastic disorders are another subcategory of GI diseases associated with cutaneous manifestations, including malignant acanthosis nigricans, Leser-Trélat sign, tylosis, Plummer-Vinson syndrome, necrolytic migratory erythema, perianal extramammary Paget disease, carcinoid syndrome, paraneoplastic dermatomyositis, and paraneoplastic pemphigus. Each of these disease processes have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of GI malignancy. This underscores the important role of dermatologists in the diagnosis, detection, monitoring, and treatment of these disorders while consulting and interacting with their GI colleagues. SN - 1097-6787 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23317980/Cutaneous_manifestations_of_gastrointestinal_disease:_part_I_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0190-9622(12)01172-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -