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Acute and potentially life-threatening tropical diseases in western travelers--a GeoSentinel multicenter study, 1996-2011.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2013 Feb; 88(2):397-404.AJ

Abstract

We performed a descriptive analysis of acute and potentially life-threatening tropical diseases among 82,825 ill western travelers reported to GeoSentinel from June of 1996 to August of 2011. We identified 3,655 patients (4.4%) with a total of 3,666 diagnoses representing 13 diseases, including falciparum malaria (76.9%), enteric fever (18.1%), and leptospirosis (2.4%). Ninety-one percent of the patients had fever; the median time from travel to presentation was 16 days. Thirteen (0.4%) patients died: 10 with falciparum malaria, 2 with melioidosis, and 1 with severe dengue. Falciparum malaria was mainly acquired in West Africa, and enteric fever was largely contracted on the Indian subcontinent; leptospirosis, scrub typhus, and murine typhus were principally acquired in Southeast Asia. Western physicians seeing febrile and recently returned travelers from the tropics need to consider a wide profile of potentially life-threatening tropical illnesses, with a specific focus on the most likely diseases described in our large case series.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Infectious Diseases, Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. mogens.jensenius@ioks.uio.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23324216

Citation

Jensenius, Mogens, et al. "Acute and Potentially Life-threatening Tropical Diseases in Western Travelers--a GeoSentinel Multicenter Study, 1996-2011." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 88, no. 2, 2013, pp. 397-404.
Jensenius M, Han PV, Schlagenhauf P, et al. Acute and potentially life-threatening tropical diseases in western travelers--a GeoSentinel multicenter study, 1996-2011. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2013;88(2):397-404.
Jensenius, M., Han, P. V., Schlagenhauf, P., Schwartz, E., Parola, P., Castelli, F., von Sonnenburg, F., Loutan, L., Leder, K., & Freedman, D. O. (2013). Acute and potentially life-threatening tropical diseases in western travelers--a GeoSentinel multicenter study, 1996-2011. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 88(2), 397-404. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.12-0551
Jensenius M, et al. Acute and Potentially Life-threatening Tropical Diseases in Western Travelers--a GeoSentinel Multicenter Study, 1996-2011. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2013;88(2):397-404. PubMed PMID: 23324216.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute and potentially life-threatening tropical diseases in western travelers--a GeoSentinel multicenter study, 1996-2011. AU - Jensenius,Mogens, AU - Han,Pauline V, AU - Schlagenhauf,Patricia, AU - Schwartz,Eli, AU - Parola,Philippe, AU - Castelli,Francesco, AU - von Sonnenburg,Frank, AU - Loutan,Louis, AU - Leder,Karin, AU - Freedman,David O, AU - ,, Y1 - 2013/01/16/ PY - 2013/1/18/entrez PY - 2013/1/18/pubmed PY - 2013/4/2/medline SP - 397 EP - 404 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. VL - 88 IS - 2 N2 - We performed a descriptive analysis of acute and potentially life-threatening tropical diseases among 82,825 ill western travelers reported to GeoSentinel from June of 1996 to August of 2011. We identified 3,655 patients (4.4%) with a total of 3,666 diagnoses representing 13 diseases, including falciparum malaria (76.9%), enteric fever (18.1%), and leptospirosis (2.4%). Ninety-one percent of the patients had fever; the median time from travel to presentation was 16 days. Thirteen (0.4%) patients died: 10 with falciparum malaria, 2 with melioidosis, and 1 with severe dengue. Falciparum malaria was mainly acquired in West Africa, and enteric fever was largely contracted on the Indian subcontinent; leptospirosis, scrub typhus, and murine typhus were principally acquired in Southeast Asia. Western physicians seeing febrile and recently returned travelers from the tropics need to consider a wide profile of potentially life-threatening tropical illnesses, with a specific focus on the most likely diseases described in our large case series. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23324216/full_citation L2 - http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.12-0551?crawler=true&mimetype=application/pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -