Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Maternal stimulation in infancy predicts hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity in young men.
J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2013 Aug; 120(8):1247-57.JN

Abstract

Evidence from animal research has demonstrated the effect of early maternal care on the offspring's endocrine and behavioral stress response in adulthood. The present prospective study investigates, in humans, the long-term impact of maternal responsiveness and stimulation during early mother-child interaction on adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol response to a psychosocial laboratory stressor in adulthood. The data are from an epidemiological cohort study of the long-term outcome of early risk factors assessed at birth. At age 3 months, mothers and infants were videotaped during a 10-min standardized nursing and playing situation and evaluated by trained raters for maternal stimulation and infant and maternal responsiveness. At age 19 years, 270 participants (146 females, 124 males) completed the Trier Social Stress Test. The results indicated that less maternal stimulation during early interaction at age 3 months predicted diminished plasma ACTH and cortisol increase in response to acute psychosocial stress in male, but not female offspring. In contrast, maternal responsiveness was found to be unrelated to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) reactivity. In accordance with the findings from animal research, the present study provides prospective evidence in humans of a long-term association between early maternal interaction behavior and the offspring's hormonal stress response in young adulthood, suggesting that poor maternal stimulation in early infancy may result in reduced HPA axis reactivity to an acute psychosocial stressor in males.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, J 5, 68159, Mannheim, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23334794

Citation

Schmid, Brigitte, et al. "Maternal Stimulation in Infancy Predicts Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal Axis Reactivity in Young Men." Journal of Neural Transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996), vol. 120, no. 8, 2013, pp. 1247-57.
Schmid B, Buchmann AF, Trautmann-Villalba P, et al. Maternal stimulation in infancy predicts hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity in young men. J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2013;120(8):1247-57.
Schmid, B., Buchmann, A. F., Trautmann-Villalba, P., Blomeyer, D., Zimmermann, U. S., Schmidt, M. H., Esser, G., Banaschewski, T., & Laucht, M. (2013). Maternal stimulation in infancy predicts hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity in young men. Journal of Neural Transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996), 120(8), 1247-57. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00702-013-0970-8
Schmid B, et al. Maternal Stimulation in Infancy Predicts Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal Axis Reactivity in Young Men. J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2013;120(8):1247-57. PubMed PMID: 23334794.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal stimulation in infancy predicts hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity in young men. AU - Schmid,Brigitte, AU - Buchmann,Arlette F, AU - Trautmann-Villalba,Patricia, AU - Blomeyer,Dorothea, AU - Zimmermann,Ulrich S, AU - Schmidt,Martin H, AU - Esser,Günter, AU - Banaschewski,Tobias, AU - Laucht,Manfred, Y1 - 2013/01/20/ PY - 2012/07/11/received PY - 2013/01/04/accepted PY - 2013/1/22/entrez PY - 2013/1/22/pubmed PY - 2014/3/13/medline SP - 1247 EP - 57 JF - Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996) JO - J Neural Transm (Vienna) VL - 120 IS - 8 N2 - Evidence from animal research has demonstrated the effect of early maternal care on the offspring's endocrine and behavioral stress response in adulthood. The present prospective study investigates, in humans, the long-term impact of maternal responsiveness and stimulation during early mother-child interaction on adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol response to a psychosocial laboratory stressor in adulthood. The data are from an epidemiological cohort study of the long-term outcome of early risk factors assessed at birth. At age 3 months, mothers and infants were videotaped during a 10-min standardized nursing and playing situation and evaluated by trained raters for maternal stimulation and infant and maternal responsiveness. At age 19 years, 270 participants (146 females, 124 males) completed the Trier Social Stress Test. The results indicated that less maternal stimulation during early interaction at age 3 months predicted diminished plasma ACTH and cortisol increase in response to acute psychosocial stress in male, but not female offspring. In contrast, maternal responsiveness was found to be unrelated to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) reactivity. In accordance with the findings from animal research, the present study provides prospective evidence in humans of a long-term association between early maternal interaction behavior and the offspring's hormonal stress response in young adulthood, suggesting that poor maternal stimulation in early infancy may result in reduced HPA axis reactivity to an acute psychosocial stressor in males. SN - 1435-1463 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23334794/Maternal_stimulation_in_infancy_predicts_hypothalamic_pituitary_adrenal_axis_reactivity_in_young_men_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s00702-013-0970-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -