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Epidemiology of mammalian hepatitis E virus infection.
Intervirology. 2013; 56(2):67-83.I

Abstract

Mammalian hepatitis E virus (HEV), the etiological agent of hepatitis E in humans, is a recently discovered infectious agent. It was identified for the first time in 1983 using electron microscopy on a faecal specimen of a person infected with non-A, non-B enterically-transmitted hepatitis. Based on retrospective and prospective studies, HEV was long described as one of the leading causes of acute viral hepatitis in tropical and subtropical countries, whereas in developed countries hepatitis E was considered an imported disease from HEV hyperendemic countries. Data from studies conducted during the past decade have greatly shifted our knowledge on the epidemiology and clinical spectrum of HEV. Recently, it has been shown that contrary to previous beliefs, hepatitis E is also an endemic disease in several developed countries, particularly in Japan and in Europe, as evidenced by reports of high anti-HEV immunoglobulin G prevalence in healthy individuals and an increasing number of non-travel-related acute hepatitis E cases. Moreover, a porcine reservoir and growing evidence of zoonotic transmission have been reported in these countries. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the epidemiology and prevention of transmission of mammalian HEV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Aix-Marseille Université, URMITE UM63 CNRS 7278 IRD 198 INSERM U1095, IHU Méditerranée Infection, Facultés de Médecine et de Pharmacie, Marseille, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23343760

Citation

Kaba, Mamadou, et al. "Epidemiology of Mammalian Hepatitis E Virus Infection." Intervirology, vol. 56, no. 2, 2013, pp. 67-83.
Kaba M, Moal V, Gérolami R, et al. Epidemiology of mammalian hepatitis E virus infection. Intervirology. 2013;56(2):67-83.
Kaba, M., Moal, V., Gérolami, R., & Colson, P. (2013). Epidemiology of mammalian hepatitis E virus infection. Intervirology, 56(2), 67-83. https://doi.org/10.1159/000342301
Kaba M, et al. Epidemiology of Mammalian Hepatitis E Virus Infection. Intervirology. 2013;56(2):67-83. PubMed PMID: 23343760.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of mammalian hepatitis E virus infection. AU - Kaba,Mamadou, AU - Moal,Valérie, AU - Gérolami,René, AU - Colson,Philippe, Y1 - 2013/01/22/ PY - 2011/06/21/received PY - 2012/07/28/accepted PY - 2013/1/25/entrez PY - 2013/1/25/pubmed PY - 2013/7/31/medline SP - 67 EP - 83 JF - Intervirology JO - Intervirology VL - 56 IS - 2 N2 - Mammalian hepatitis E virus (HEV), the etiological agent of hepatitis E in humans, is a recently discovered infectious agent. It was identified for the first time in 1983 using electron microscopy on a faecal specimen of a person infected with non-A, non-B enterically-transmitted hepatitis. Based on retrospective and prospective studies, HEV was long described as one of the leading causes of acute viral hepatitis in tropical and subtropical countries, whereas in developed countries hepatitis E was considered an imported disease from HEV hyperendemic countries. Data from studies conducted during the past decade have greatly shifted our knowledge on the epidemiology and clinical spectrum of HEV. Recently, it has been shown that contrary to previous beliefs, hepatitis E is also an endemic disease in several developed countries, particularly in Japan and in Europe, as evidenced by reports of high anti-HEV immunoglobulin G prevalence in healthy individuals and an increasing number of non-travel-related acute hepatitis E cases. Moreover, a porcine reservoir and growing evidence of zoonotic transmission have been reported in these countries. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the epidemiology and prevention of transmission of mammalian HEV. SN - 1423-0100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23343760/Epidemiology_of_mammalian_hepatitis_E_virus_infection_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000342301 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -