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Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of breast cancer by hormone receptor status.
J Natl Cancer Inst 2013; 105(3):219-36JNCI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Estrogen receptor-negative (ER(-)) breast cancer has few known or modifiable risk factors. Because ER(-) tumors account for only 15% to 20% of breast cancers, large pooled analyses are necessary to evaluate precisely the suspected inverse association between fruit and vegetable intake and risk of ER(-) breast cancer.

METHODS

Among 993 466 women followed for 11 to 20 years in 20 cohort studies, we documented 19 869 estrogen receptor positive (ER(+)) and 4821 ER(-) breast cancers. We calculated study-specific multivariable relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using Cox proportional hazards regression analyses and then combined them using a random-effects model. All statistical tests were two-sided.

RESULTS

Total fruit and vegetable intake was statistically significantly inversely associated with risk of ER(-) breast cancer but not with risk of breast cancer overall or of ER(+) tumors. The inverse association for ER(-) tumors was observed primarily for vegetable consumption. The pooled relative risks comparing the highest vs lowest quintile of total vegetable consumption were 0.82 (95% CI = 0.74 to 0.90) for ER(-) breast cancer and 1.04 (95% CI = 0.97 to 1.11) for ER(+) breast cancer (P (common-effects) by ER status < .001). Total fruit consumption was non-statistically significantly associated with risk of ER(-) breast cancer (pooled multivariable RR comparing the highest vs lowest quintile = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.85 to 1.04).

CONCLUSIONS

We observed no association between total fruit and vegetable intake and risk of overall breast cancer. However, vegetable consumption was inversely associated with risk of ER(-) breast cancer in our large pooled analyses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. pojun@channing.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23349252

Citation

Jung, Seungyoun, et al. "Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Risk of Breast Cancer By Hormone Receptor Status." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 105, no. 3, 2013, pp. 219-36.
Jung S, Spiegelman D, Baglietto L, et al. Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of breast cancer by hormone receptor status. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2013;105(3):219-36.
Jung, S., Spiegelman, D., Baglietto, L., Bernstein, L., Boggs, D. A., van den Brandt, P. A., ... Smith-Warner, S. A. (2013). Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of breast cancer by hormone receptor status. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 105(3), pp. 219-36. doi:10.1093/jnci/djs635.
Jung S, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Risk of Breast Cancer By Hormone Receptor Status. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2013 Feb 6;105(3):219-36. PubMed PMID: 23349252.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of breast cancer by hormone receptor status. AU - Jung,Seungyoun, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Baglietto,Laura, AU - Bernstein,Leslie, AU - Boggs,Deborah A, AU - van den Brandt,Piet A, AU - Buring,Julie E, AU - Cerhan,James R, AU - Gaudet,Mia M, AU - Giles,Graham G, AU - Goodman,Gary, AU - Hakansson,Niclas, AU - Hankinson,Susan E, AU - Helzlsouer,Kathy, AU - Horn-Ross,Pamela L, AU - Inoue,Manami, AU - Krogh,Vittorio, AU - Lof,Marie, AU - McCullough,Marjorie L, AU - Miller,Anthony B, AU - Neuhouser,Marian L, AU - Palmer,Julie R, AU - Park,Yikyung, AU - Robien,Kim, AU - Rohan,Thomas E, AU - Scarmo,Stephanie, AU - Schairer,Catherine, AU - Schouten,Leo J, AU - Shikany,James M, AU - Sieri,Sabina, AU - Tsugane,Schoichiro, AU - Visvanathan,Kala, AU - Weiderpass,Elisabete, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Wolk,Alicja, AU - Zeleniuch-Jacquotte,Anne, AU - Zhang,Shumin M, AU - Zhang,Xuehong, AU - Ziegler,Regina G, AU - Smith-Warner,Stephanie A, Y1 - 2013/01/24/ PY - 2013/1/26/entrez PY - 2013/1/26/pubmed PY - 2013/4/2/medline SP - 219 EP - 36 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 105 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Estrogen receptor-negative (ER(-)) breast cancer has few known or modifiable risk factors. Because ER(-) tumors account for only 15% to 20% of breast cancers, large pooled analyses are necessary to evaluate precisely the suspected inverse association between fruit and vegetable intake and risk of ER(-) breast cancer. METHODS: Among 993 466 women followed for 11 to 20 years in 20 cohort studies, we documented 19 869 estrogen receptor positive (ER(+)) and 4821 ER(-) breast cancers. We calculated study-specific multivariable relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using Cox proportional hazards regression analyses and then combined them using a random-effects model. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Total fruit and vegetable intake was statistically significantly inversely associated with risk of ER(-) breast cancer but not with risk of breast cancer overall or of ER(+) tumors. The inverse association for ER(-) tumors was observed primarily for vegetable consumption. The pooled relative risks comparing the highest vs lowest quintile of total vegetable consumption were 0.82 (95% CI = 0.74 to 0.90) for ER(-) breast cancer and 1.04 (95% CI = 0.97 to 1.11) for ER(+) breast cancer (P (common-effects) by ER status < .001). Total fruit consumption was non-statistically significantly associated with risk of ER(-) breast cancer (pooled multivariable RR comparing the highest vs lowest quintile = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.85 to 1.04). CONCLUSIONS: We observed no association between total fruit and vegetable intake and risk of overall breast cancer. However, vegetable consumption was inversely associated with risk of ER(-) breast cancer in our large pooled analyses. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23349252/Fruit_and_vegetable_intake_and_risk_of_breast_cancer_by_hormone_receptor_status_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djs635 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -